Tag Archives: Post Frame Home

Hand Winches, Mono Trusses, and a Post Frame Home

This Monday the Pole Barn Guru answers reader questions about the use of hand winches to raise trusses, how to secure mono trusses built from complete trusses – DON’T- and the costs to build a small post frame home.

DEAR POLE BARN GURU: I’m curious of the stability of wet set brackets during raising our roof sections. We build our roof bays on the ground with purlins installed then use hand winches mounted to our columns with a pulley at the top. All our columns are embedded in the ground. Would wet-set brackets be stable enough for us to still winch up our truss bays with purlins attached? BRANDON in SNEEDVILLE

DEAR BRANDON: Provided your wet set brackets’ concrete piers have been properly sized by your building’s engineer to resist gravity, overturning and uplift loads there should be no issues with winching up your truss bays.

For extended reading on winch boxes, please see: https://www.hansenpolebuildings.com/2020/09/diy-post-frame-construction-and-winch-boxes/

 

DEAR POLE BARN GURU: I am separating full trusses, 26 ft., 5/12, and making 10 mono trusses. I am using them to make a lean-to to my pole barn. I plan to attach them to the poles/posts, what hardware would you use to hang the bottom cord and top cord (and anything in between) to the side of the pole barn? Thank you! TOM in HASTINGS

DEAR TOM: First problem is splitting those gabled trusses down their centers will not make for two structurally sound monoslope trusses and they should not be used without an engineered repair. As to attaching these to your main building columns (once they are repaired), this should be designed by a Registered Professional engineer, ideally whomever engineered your original building, as they should also be verifying adequacy of your existing building columns and their footings to properly carry loads added by this lean-to.

 

DEAR POLE BARN GURU: I am interested in a smaller pole barn house…around 1200 sq. ft. I would prefer to have a two-story or at least a good sized loft. i wanted a concrete slab…the floors acid washed. Is this possible with a $50,000 budget? DYANN I THEODOSIA

DEAR DYANN: Turnkey living spaces, with modest tastes, currently average around $130 per square foot. If you DIY everything, you can probably cut this in half. If your overall footprint is 1200 square feet, you need to add to this any second floor, loft or mezzanine area. In answer to your question – your $50,000 budget is sadly just not going to make it. Good news is – with interest rates hovering at 3%, it does make borrowing to build very affordable.

 

 

 

Raised Floor in Flood Area, Drywall Framing, and Water in Holes

This Monday the Pole Barn Guru answers reader questions about post frame with a raised floor use in a flood area, framing for drywall in a post frame house, and post holes full of water could be bigger soil issue.

DEAR POLE BARN GURU: Do you have a kit that can be used in a flood area to raise floor about 10 feet. RAY in HOUSTON

DEAR RAY: Yes we do – they are stilt houses and have to be custom engineered for each individual circumstance. Rear more here: https://www.hansenpolebuildings.com/2017/09/stilt-houses/

 

DEAR POLE BARN GURU: We’re considering post frame construction for our residence. I’m sill researching and learning. One big question I have is: why does is seem like most people are putting stud walls against the exterior walls of the structure? Are the existing walls not sound enough to support the weight of drywall or wood finishing? Is it necessary for running plumbing/electrical? Is it overkill? WILL in ISLANDTON

DEAR WILL: Congratulations upon considering post frame construction as your structural design solution. Sadly, most kit providers and builders are selling building shells based upon cheapest price, rather than meeting their client’s needs. With this low price, most often comes what is known as externally mounted wall girts – wall framing to support siding being attached wide face to wind on outside of columns. While this is quick, easy and takes little thought, it rarely meets Building Code requirements for meeting deflection criteria. There is a way to solve wall framing to be a one step process – bookshelf wall girts every 24 inches. This creates a very stiff wall structurally, provides an insulation cavity and requires no extra framing to add interior finishes.

 

DEAR POLE BARN GURU: Holes for barn posts were full of water. Installed drain tile and water ran off. Now the post holes are very soft and I don’t believe they will support the structure. Ideas? STEVE in FELCH

DEAR STEVE: If you place a 2×4 vertically in a hole and push downward on it and it just keeps sinking, you have a challenge going on. Your best solution then is going to be to hire a geotechnical engineer to visit your site and do a determination of how to adequately support your building based upon actual soil conditions. It may be able to be solved by use of larger diameter footings, or use of rebar within your slab (tied to columns), piers down to solid bedrock or some combination of these. Your building will only be as strong as your foundation, so this is not a place to mess around or guess.

Should your 2×4 above only go down a few inches, then you only need to remove loose soil at bottom of holes and pour concrete pads as indicated on your engineer sealed plans.

 

Insulation Costs, A Pole Barn Home, and Wall Steel Options

This week the Pole Barn Guru answers reader questions about adding insulation to a quote, a quote for a pole barn home, and the use of standing seam steel on exterior walls.

DEAR POLE BARN GURU: I live in Jim Thorpe, PA and have ordered a 20×24 Pole Building. The quote didn’t include insulation. So I asked for a separate quote. The quote included the following:

Openings
(1) Ceiling Liner access door insulated White $275
Insulation
Wall: R-21 w/Liner
Roof: R-38 w/Ceiling Liner
$5,808
$2,323

They don’t include the materials used, so I can’t research the materials cost. But does this sound like a reasonable quote? Seems high, but this is my first pole building. Maybe material cost is like lumber, UP UP UP…?

Can you give me your opinion or shed (no pun intended) any light on this? Thanks so much! ROBERT

DEAR ROBERT: Without knowing your building height, number and dimensions of windows and doors and how your building is proposed to be framed (without any liner), it is impossible to determine if this is or is not reasonable. Keep in mind, probably roughly half of this price is due to your provider’s overhead, profit and labor, so if you are handy at all, you might want to consider doing this work yourself.

 

DEAR POLE BARN GURU: Looking for a pole barn home.
Wish List:
Ranch Style
3 bedroom 2 bath
1 craft-hobby room
Overhang porch
Attached 2 car garage
Can this be designed and priced?
JOLENE in DUBUQUE

DEAR JOLENE: Yes, it can be both designed and priced.

First Step is the design phase:

Have professional floor plans and elevation drawings done before pestering a builder. Very few builders are professional designers or architects – expecting them to be is unrealistic.

If you do not own the dirt, it is impossible to craft a barndominium plan to best fit with your building site.

Some plan tips to consider:

Direction of access – driveways are not cheap and shortest distance between two points is a straight line.
Curb appeal – what will people see when they drive up? This may not be important to you, however some day someone will try to resell your barndominium.

Is there an appealing view?

North-south alignment – place no or few windows on north walls, but lots of windows on south wall. Roof overhangs on south wall should provide shade to windows from mid-day summer sun.

Is there a slope on your building site?

Work from inside out – do not try to fit your wants and needs within a preordained box just because someone said using a “standard” size might be cheaper. Differences in dimensions from “standard” are pennies per square foot, not dollars.

Popular home spaces and sizes need to be determined:

Room in a Barndominium

With all of this in mind, order our custom designed floor plans here: http://www.hansenpolebuildings.com/post-frame-floor-plans/?fbclid=IwAR2ta5IFSxrltv5eAyBVmg-JUsoPfy9hbWtP86svOTPfG1q5pGmfhA7yd5Q

Once your floor plans and elevation drawings have been completed, we can then give you an exact price.

 

DEAR POLE BARN GURU: Hi, my question is, can the standing seam roofing material you show in your building catalog be use for siding? RICH in MARYVILLE

DEAR RICH: Absolutely, however it would need to be applied over 5/8″ CDX plywood as it is non-structural. Small world – my oldest son and his family lived in Maryville for many years, his mother and I helped build a post frame garage with a mother-in-law apartment above it in their backyard.

 

 

Residential Building, I-Joist Purlins, and Post Proximity

This week the Pole Barn Guru answers reader questions about whether or not Hansen can provide a residential building kit in their area, if Mike advises the use of I-Joists as purlins, and post proximity– how close can two posts be to each other?

DEAR POLE BARN GURU: Do you build residential buildings in the greater Fort Wayne, IN area? BRIAN in FORT WAYNE

Click here to download our free brochure!DEAR BRIAN: Hansen Pole Buildings provides fully engineered, custom designed post frame buildings, with multiple buildings in all 50 states (including roughly a hundred of them in Indiana). We ship from over 4000 locations – so chances are we are ‘close’ to you! Your new building will be designed for an average physically capable person who can and will read instructions to successfully construct your own beautiful buildings (and many of our clients do DIY). Your building will come with full 24” x 36” structural blueprints detailing the location and attachment of every piece (suitable for obtaining Building Permits), a 500 page fully illustrated step-by-step installation manual, as well as unlimited technical support from people who have actually built buildings. For those without the time or inclination, we have an extensive independent Builder Network covering the contiguous 48 states. We can assist you in getting erection labor pricing as well as introducing you to potential builders. We would appreciate the opportunity to participate in your new home. Please email your building plans, site address and best contact number to our Design Studio Manager Caleb@HansenPoleBuildings.com

One of our Building Designers will be reaching out to you shortly to discuss your building needs, or dial .866.200.9657 for immediate assistance.

 

DEAR POLE BARN GURU: I’ve read your reasonings and seen your snippets of engineering drawings that spec 2x purlins hanging between trusses. I’m wondering if now that I-joists are becoming so popular for residential use, if you’ve ever tried to use them as purlins. A 9.5″ I-joist would allow for 8″ of mixed closed and open cell spray foam, and a bottom flange of 1.5″ for light fixtures, wiring, etc. And I think I-joists would be lighter than 2x10s (and in this economy maybe even cost less!).
Thank you,
Thinking About A Hansen Handsome Barndominium, Or more accurately, GUY in JOHNSON CITY

DEAR GUY: I’ve used engineered floor trusses for roof purlins, but never I-joists. While I do not personally like them for floors (I find them bouncy), they do work as a replacement for dimensional lumber joists and rafters. I-joists are fairly strong when loads are applied directly perpendicular, however they are not strong in weak axis bending (e.g. loads applied when they are rotated from vertical). While they might work as roof purlins, it would take a significant amount of blocking and/or bracing plus some healthy engineering analysis in order to design a system to restrain them from buckling.

 

DEAR POLE BARN GURU: How close can the posts actually be to each other? Are there physical limitations to drilling two holes 12 inches apart? The reason I ask is I want to build a garage that mirrors the garage on my house, and the first 9 foot wide door is 25 inches from a corner and the spacing between the two doors is only 15 inches, rough opening to rough opening. Does one just dig a hole large enough for both posts? Or should two holes be drilled that overlap? SCOTT in BROOKSTON


DEAR SCOTT:
Two posts can actually be in direct contact with each other, if necessary to support things like door openings. When two columns are close together, it is usually easiest to end up digging what resembles a trench, rather than a larger diameter hole (effectively drilling two overlapping holes).

 

 

Protect Your Right to Freedom of Choice

Today we take a momentary pause from contracts to protect your right to freedom of choice.

Your first question is going to be, “Why should I care about what Madison County, IL does?

Easy answer – because what one jurisdiction does, another is sure to follow, then another, then another.

But I don’t care about post- frame homes or a pole barn house!

If you think this will stop at just post-frame, I have some ocean front property in Arizona for sale on the cheap!

This is from a June 23 story in “The Telegraph” (you can email the author at SCousins@thetelegraph.com):

“Madison County is considering a minor change in zoning codes dealing with pole barn houses.

On Tuesday, a petition for text amendments to Madison County zoning ordinances to tighten requirements for “pole barn houses” in agricultural areas was presented to the Madison County Zoning Board of Appeals.

Current ordinances require 2 acres to build the homes. If approved, the change would require 5 acres.

The county routinely reviews zoning codes and makes amendments every year or so to reflect changes in state or local laws and to correct any mistakes. The last time that was done was in 2019.”

In response I sent this email to zoning@co.madison.il.us and asked for it to be directed to the Zoning Board of Appeals (chairperson is a Mr. Metzler):

“I respectfully submit, for your consideration, the following:

Fully engineered post-frame buildings (pole barn houses in this article) can be entirely Code conforming structural systems. There may be a thought pole barn houses are ‘unsightly’ to some, due to being most often sided with roll formed steel panels. Post frame buildings can have any roofing and/or siding materials found on other structural systems, such as stud wall (stick frame). Sidings can include wood, vinyl, masonry, stucco, the possibilities being endless. To place a restriction only upon one structural system, rather than all systems universally could be seen as prejudicial, as well as a restriction of free trade and Interstate Commerce.

Rather than taking the proposed approach, I would offer up for consideration allowing for any engineered and Code conforming structural system to be used for a dwelling in any allowable zone, with the caveat of placing restrictions instead upon what materials may be used to clad said systems. If the true objection is to vertical steel siding,  unpainted galvanized steel cladding, or even particular color(s) or combinations, then state as such and make it universal on any fully engineered structural system.

As it now stands, one could erect a stick framed home, and cover it with steel cladding, whereas it would appear from the street to be a “pole barn house”, yet it would be conforming.”

I implore you to take a few minutes from your busy day and email Madison County’s Zoning Board of Appeals and Mr. Cousins at The Telegraph to assist in defeating this onerous proposal.

Madison County’s Zoning Board of Appeals meets next Tuesday, so please do not delay as time is of the essence.

I thank you, in advance, for your consideration. Please share this with your friends.

Attic Truss Lofts, Wall Switch Heights, and A Shouse

Today the Pole Barn Guru responds to reader questions about an attic truss loft, whether or not wall switches and outlet heights are different for post frame, and building a shouse– garage with living space above (Shop/House).

DEAR POLE BARN GURU: Is it possible to have a loft in a 30 x 50 x 8 pole barn with a 6/12 pitch using attic trusses? If the pole barn had 10′ side walls instead of 8′, how do you create the floor for the loft and still maintain only 8′ interior walls? WANDA in GAYLORD

DEAR WANDA: At a 6/12 roof slope a 30 foot span truss only increases in height by 90″ (7’6″) making overall building height with a 10 foot eave 17’6″. Even if your attic trusses were to have bottom of truss set at 8′ 4-5/8″ (perfect height for a finished 8′ ceiling) your bonus room would be very small and have limited headroom. If you wish to pursue this route, I would recommend an increase in roof slope to at least 8/12.

 

DEAR POLE BARN GURU: In Michigan, is the code for the height of wall switches and outlets the same for pole barns as it is in a home? GARREY in ROMULUS

DEAR GARREY: Regardless of state and type of structural system, electrical codes remain the same.

 

DEAR POLE BARN GURU: We want to put up a garage with living space above, 40 x 33 ish. but we have to have a cement basement foundation as it is 4′ into a hill. Can we have do this with this kind of construction? We had a design for stick construction but it is too expensive. Thanks! TINA in UNDERWOOD

DEAR TINA: Fully engineered post frame, PEMB and weld up barndominiums CAN be more affordable than stick frame. But, they are not going to be 10-50% less. Think about it – your only differences are in structural systems, all of your electrical, plumbing, HVAC, insulation, interior finishes, fixtures, cabinets, floor coverings, etc., are going to be identical investments no matter what structural system is chosen.

Your fully engineered post frame building can be designed quite readily with columns bracket mounted to poured concrete or ICF foundation walls, however you may find it more practical to utilize a Permanent Wood Foundation wall between columns where your site forces you to excavate.

 

 

 

 

 

Post Frame Homes

Post Frame Homes – Coming Soon to a Neighborhood Near You

After providing or building post frame (pole) buildings for over 40 years, one might think there would be very few things coming as a surprise to me.

Well…..SURPRISE!

Barndominiums and shop houses are no surprise to me at all. I first built one for myself in Northwest Washington State more than 25 years ago (although I suppose we could dial this back to even 1990). This ‘dial back’ was on steeply sloping property where my grandparents had their lake cabin (previously having belonged to my maternal grandfather’s parents since 1937). An aging two-car Model T garage set on cedar posts was showing not only signs of age, but was dimensionally impractical for modern sized vehicles.

My solution then was to tear the old garage down to its elevated floor, build a new post frame building around it, then drop the old floor out. Being as this new, larger footprint (22’ x 24’) garage was on 4 feet of grade change, I was able to construct a 16’ x 22’ studio apartment below it and by using bonus room attic trusses (and a spiral staircase in one corner) was able to have a 10’ x 24’ office space above!

Both of these buildings were on a 60’ x 225’ lot, in the midst of dwellings on both sides. Being as we were located in a forest, it didn’t feel like we had homes right on top of our neighbors.

Now, back to our photo….

When our client approached us about a post frame home on Lake Havasu, I really didn’t envision it being located tight amongst other homes. Most of our barndominium clients enjoy open space where they can avoid bumping elbows with their neighbors. It wasn’t until this particular client forwarded to us progress photos of their build when I had an ah-ha moment!

This client is building in a neighborhood!

Our client is providing their own tile roofing and applying stucco to their building’s exterior. When all is said and done, no one will be wiser to this being a post frame home, unless they happened to watch it being built.

While post frame barndominiums are renowned for their flexibility of design, I can see some astute building contractors realizing foundation cost savings and speed of erection making for a practical solution for most any neighborhood.

How Tall Are Barn Homes?

Reader CAROLYN in INDIANAPOLIS writes:

“How tall are barn homes? I didn’t know what height to put in…I like tall ceilings …also do u build the homes also?”

Fully engineered post frame homes and barndominiums (barn homes) are beautiful because they only limit your heights under Building Codes to three stories and a 40 foot wall height (add another story and 10 feet for having fire suppression sprinklers – a good idea anyhow). My lovely bride and I live in a post frame home with a 44 foot overall height (and a cupola on top of it). Although this article is written for two story homes it may prove helpful: https://www.hansenpolebuildings.com/2020/05/how-tall-should-my-eave-height-be-for-two-stories/.

Ideally ceiling height measures when framed should be an extra 1-1/8″ taller than your actual finished ceiling (e.g. 10′ 1-1/8″ for 10′ finished). 10′ ceilings have become very popular as well – “my” Vikings bathroom (yes has Vikings’ colors and stuff all over it). 10′ is also cost effective if batt wall insulation is used and drywall can be often purchased in 4′ x 10′ sheets. Our living room ceiling is 16′ as my wife likes her tall Christmas tree, she leaves it up all year long!

This article may also prove helpful to you https://www.hansenpolebuildings.com/2021/02/a-shortlist-for-smooth-barndominium-sailing/.

www.HansenPoleBuildings.com provides fully engineered, custom designed post frame buildings, with multiple buildings in all 50 states. We ship from over 4000 locations – so chances are we are ‘close’ to you! Your new building will be designed for an average physically capable person who can and will read instructions to successfully construct your own beautiful building (and many of our clients do DIY).

Your building will come with full 24” x 36” structural blueprints detailing the location and attachment of every piece (suitable for obtaining Building Permits), a 500 page fully illustrated step-by-step installation manual, as well as unlimited technical support from people who have actually built buildings.

For those without the time or inclination, we have an extensive independent Builder Network covering the contiguous 48 states. We can assist you in getting erection labor pricing as well as introducing you to potential builders.

We would appreciate the opportunity to participate in your new home. Once you have them, please email your building plans, site address and best contact number to our Design Studio Manager Caleb@HansenPoleBuildings.com 1(866)200-9657 Thank you.

Looking for a Place for a New Barndominium

Looking for a Place for a New Barndominium

Reader PATTI in MINNESOTA writes:

My husband and I are knocking around the idea of doing a Barndominium. 

We need a 4-5 car garage space and we can barely afford a traditional preloved home that has a 3-car garage which will require us to add another stall or two onto an already taxing home price!

I’m optimistic that we can pull off everything that’s needed and hopefully within the budget!

I’m doing the bulk of the research and found your site to be so packed with worthwhile information.  I want to see what you’d be able to do for us to make this as seamless and headache free as possible?

I started looking for property and messaged the City Halls for the locations we want to see if they’d allow such a structure.  Not sure how to handle the siding issue.

Inver Grove Heights, MN 

Will consider it a single family home.  Needs to meet setback, height and doesn’t exceed allowed impervious surface for the lot.  

Exterior siding regulations require horizontal lap type siding or similar.  Vertical siding like a pole barn is not acceptable material.  

**** Is this even possible to meet this request or is there a way we can argue against it.  Any knowledge you can offer would be so helpful****

Rosemount, MN

“The structure would function as a single family home, and therefore the exterior materials would need to be complementary to a residential structure (no metal siding, etc.).  Additionally, the foundation would need to meet the building code requirements for frost footings.  Also, the zoning code regulates the size of attached garages as follows: The footprint of an attached garage is a maximum of 1,000 square feet but can be increased up to a maximum of 1,500 square feet so long as the garage does not exceed 50 percent of the gross floor area of the principal building (garage and living area combined).”

Farmington, MN

*Considers this Agricultural that would need a minimum of 40 acres, what!!!

****Is this common and is there anything we can do to fight this so we get this under a single family home that we could put on a .25 acre plot?****”

Mike the Pole Barn Guru responds:

Thank you for reaching out to us and for your kind words.

Planning Departments are an extension of a jurisdiction’s ruling body (city council, county commissioners) and have basically power of life and death. They can dictate footprints, heights, setbacks, type of cladding (roofing and/or siding), and even colors. They ARE limited to ordinances written by their ruling body, so if you do not hear an answer you like, ask for a copy of their written ordinance. If they cannot produce one, then it does not exist and can be disregarded.

One beauty of fully engineered post frame construction is a broad variety of siding and/or roofing options are readily available.

Inver Grove Heights – exterior siding is within their realm of control.  At www ighmn.gov go to “City Code” in the left hand menu list and click on it. Scroll down to Chapter 15, then 10-15-17. B.2 gives your options with steel being none of them.

Rosemont – you do not have to pour a concrete foundation to meet Code requirements for frost. You will have to insulate the perimeter of your building to at least four feet below grade, not a big deal and can be done with rigid insulation (this insulation is typical for any type of structure). If you erect a 3000 square foot (sft) building, as much as 1500 sft can be garage.

Farmington – you threw them off at “pole barn house”. You are building a fully engineered custom designed wood frame home. This should be allowable anywhere zoned for single family residences. You may have exterior appearance and footprint issues once they have gotten this into their heads as being a SFR (Single Family Residence).

You will find as you get farther away from Minneapolis and into county rather than city controlled areas, things tend to become more property owner friendly. You also might consider South Dakota as an option, as our Planning and Zoning restrictions are few and far between.

Post Frame Home Zero Barrier Entry Over a Crawl Space

Post Frame Home Zero Barrier Entry Over a Crawl Space

Reader MARC in AUBURN writes:

“I am asking what might be an odd question, but I need to ask it to see if it is even an option.

Is it possible to build a post frame home with part of it having a concrete floor (garage area) and the other part be built on a raised wood joist subfloor spring that I have a 4 foot crawl. The trick is, I want zero barrier entry so the sub floor and the garage floor would need to be level. Same with porches, etc.  is this doable without building an actual foundation wall around the home section?  I want to avoid traditional foundations and want to rely on the superior properties of a properly engineered and constructed post frame building. Am I better off just going all slab without a crawl?  

Thank you!”

Not an odd question at all and yes it is an option. I (and my knees) personally prefer to live on wood floors, rather than concrete. Our household also relates to zero barrier entry as my lovely bride Judy is a paraplegic confined to a wheelchair.

We can design your living space using permanent wood foundation walls between roof supporting pressure preservative treated columns.

Treated wood foundations are load-bearing, pressure-treated wood framed walls, used below grade to support light frame construction. Treated wood foundations are commonly called Permanent Wood Foundations or All-Weather Wood Foundations. Since being developed in the 1960s, this unique building system has proven to be a durable building system in thousands of physical applications. Treated wood foundations have undergone extensive research, analysis, and testing by several highly respected building construction industry organizations. They have been approved for use by model building codes, federal agencies, and by lending, warranty and insurance institutions. A treated wood foundation, when installed, waterproofed, and drained properly, and used in conjunction with other waterproof materials, is a viable alternative to poured concrete or concrete block foundations. When I added onto my home near Spokane, Washington 30 years ago, I utilized pressure preservative treated wood as a foundation around an irregular crawl space supporting two floors and cantilevered decks above. It has performed admirably, even in a severe lakefront environment.

Treated wood foundations are built on most types of soils (Group I – III), with an exception of unsatisfactory soils (Group IV) as defined by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Group IV soils typically have over 40% clay, less than 50% sand and may have a high shrink-swell potential. Similar to conventional foundation systems, sites should be cleared of organic material and top soil prior to work onset. Crawl space is then excavated, and a footing is placed on undisturbed soil below frost line. Footings under a treated wood foundation wall can be made of poured concrete or a wood footing plate on top of granular fill. In my case, I used a poured concrete footing, however in your instance, since vertically carried loads would be minimal, gravel should prove more than sufficient. as footing size is engineered based on foundation wall loads. Adequate, unobstructed drainage around a treated wood foundation is achieved by having continuous granular fill on building sides and underneath structure. Granular material can be up to 1/2 inch crushed stone, 3/4 inch gravel or 1/16 inch sand depending on where it is intended to be used. All granular material should be clean and free of silt, clay and organic material, and be covered with a 6-mil polyethylene sheeting. Sump pumps, perimeter drains, and dry wells may be used under your crawl space floor and around the exterior to promote drainage.  Storm water control including gutters, downspouts, splash blocks and drainpipes, in addition to a properly sloped finish grade, is also important to direct water away from the structure. 

Materials used to construct treated wood foundations include: plywood, preservative treated lumber, fasteners, termite protection (where appropriate), a moisture barrier, sealing, and insulation. All framing lumber below grade in a treated wood foundation is required to be pressure treated with preservatives in accordance with the American Wood Preservers’ Association (AWPA) Standard C22, “Lumber and Plywood for Permanent Wood Foundations – Preservative Treatment by Pressure Processes.” An important consideration when building a treated wood foundation is the metal used in the fasteners. Due to the high levels of copper in wood preservatives, fasteners are required to be a corrosion-resistant. Type 304 or 316 stainless steel nails are recommended.

An essential part of a treated wood foundation system is moisture and termite protection. In addition to a 6-mil polyethylene sheet wrapped around exterior plywood sheathing, all sheathing joints must be caulked with a high-performance acrylic latex or polyurethane caulk. Preservative treated wood eliminates termites from crawl space framing, because termites cannot penetrate it; however, additional steps should be taken to protect untreated floors above.

Several advantages make treated wood foundations an attractive option. Construction of a treated wood foundation is simple to erect, in comparison to concrete foundations. Treated wood foundations also offer advantages over concrete foundations such as an ability to install insulation between studs, affording a higher R-Value in comparison to uninsulated concrete foundation walls, leading to greater energy efficiency.

Connecting Structures, Help with Connections, and a New Home

Today’s Pole Barn Guru answers questions about connecting structures, connections for a DIY project, and help with information to build a new home.

DEAR POLE BARN GURU: What is the easiest way to connect 30x50x16 to 30x50x16? JACK in CARDWELL

DEAR JACK: Connected end-to-end will be easiest. Your overall “new building” will need to be evaluated by an engineer for structural integrity as a unit, unless a wall of adequate strength remains between these two sections. When you create a long, narrow, tall building wind shear loads can create some structural challenges.

DEAR POLE BARN GURU: We have made a deposit to Steel Commander for a 40X100 residential structure. What would be the cost for you to supply me a full detail of all the connection points? We plan on assembling the building ourselves as I have a background in welding and fabricating and pretty confident we can successfully do this……………..your thoughts? DAVE in OXFORD

DEAR DAVE: In my humble opinion, any building supplier who is not providing complete step-by-step installation instructions, knowing they are selling to a DIYer, is doing a terrible disservice. My expertise is in post frame buildings, so I am afraid I won’t be much help.

 

DEAR POLE BARN GURU: My wife and I are in the market for a new home and we were considering a pole barn house but don’t know where to begin, Any information would be greatly appreciated, thanks. SHAWN

DEAR SHAWN: This article has numerous links in it and should prove helpful in getting you started on your exciting new journey! https://www.hansenpolebuildings.com/2019/10/show-me-your-barndominium-plans-please/

 

Planning Interior Accessibility in Barndominiums

Good Morning! This is Mike the Pole Barn Guru’s wife filling in for him as he takes a couple of well deserved days off from writing.

Not too long ago Mike wrote a blog discussing how to plan the interior of your new barndominium or shouse (shop/house). He had some good ideas but there are a few things I’d like to add. In discussing kitchen ideas he mentioned having two dishwashers (they rotate and keep even the pots and pans from having to be scrubbed by hand). Also his idea of having two microwaves works out wonderfully. We can both reheat leftovers in our “His and Hers” microwaves giving us time to eat together and no waiting.

Another thing we did in building our cabinets was to put the dishwashers on a wood pedestal by the seating for the bar area. Dishes are easier to add or remove at that height for both Mike and myself. I’m in a tall power wheelchair so access to appliances is paramount for me.

As an aside, Mike may have mentioned I was in a motorcycle accident almost five years ago, leaving me paralyzed from the chest down. But there’s nothing wrong with my arms or my brain so I try to be as independent as possible. The all fridge/all freezer combo is also on a pedestal a foot off the floor. Easier for Mike to access items from the top shelves as he is 6’5″. That way I can access the bottom two shelves and the drawers, as well as the door compartments.

The part I wish to add about access in the kitchen or anywhere in the home is widths for getting around in a wheelchair. You never know when someone in your household may have to use crutches, a walker or sad to say, a wheelchair.
When we built our two story barndominium, I was normal. We had our kitchen, bath and bedroom custom cabinets installed before my accident. It’s amazing how wonderful these changes to what people usually design has worked out to my ease of access and comfort.

The aisleways between an island or peninsula should also be plenty wide for two people working in a kitchen at the same time. Again, without knowing we’d need more width between counters and appliances, we designed the kitchen with 52″ between the kitchen sink and island. We used a full 5′ between the island and fridge/freezer area due to the doors possibly being open when the other one of want’s to get by. Both allow Mike and I to be working in the kitchen at the same time and he can zip around my chair if need be.

I’ll touch on a few areas in the home where a handicapped person can function easier if planning ahead for that unforeseen circumstance. These changes also allow you to entertain handicapped or physically challenged persons in your home.
In bedrooms leave a good width all around your bed. We have 5′ on all three sides which is just about right. My desk I’m writing on is up on 8″ wooden blocks so my wheelchair fits neatly within the chair hole. We left a good space between the bed and the outer wall, as we had planned for a circular stairway up to a third level loft area that looks down on the bedroom. Thankfully we never got around to putting in that stairs and instead, we have an electric lift which takes me up to my “lady lair”. I can leave my sewing and craft projects out all the time and don’t have to rush to clear off a dining room table once visitors come to our home.
The bathroom. We have a true roll-in shower. No lip to roll over like one might find in a hotel bathroom. The tile is sloped just right for the water to roll off into the drain. We do use a shower curtain to prevent the spray from going all over the vanity area and bathroom door. The bathroom doubles as a laundry area with washer/dryer at one end. These are also up on drawer pedestals. I love having them next to the bathroom and walk-in closet. I don’t have to lug dirty or clean clothes to another part of our home. I can hang up shirts, shorts and the like directly out of the dryer. It saves a ton of time and our laundry area and “roll-in” closet always look neat and organized. There is even a counter in the closet for folding clothes before easily putting them away in the drawers beneath. Baskets in the walk-in closet collect dirty clothes and I can easily sort them before washing.

Doorways. Ours are standard width. The clearance is 35″ which is too narrow. I hate to admit it, but our nice door jambs have more than one gouge from me running into them. I’m not a bad driver, but sometimes I get too close to one side or another, especially when backing up.
Lastly, NO carpeting. We have all hardwood floors, which are beautiful and make zipping around in my wheelchair a breeze.

Thank you for taking the time to see things through my eyes a bit.
Have a great rest of your day!

Judy
J.A. Hansen

Roof Steel, Building a Post Frame House, and Fire Restoration

This week the Pole Barn Guru answers questions about a possible roof steel replacement, planning a post frame house, and assistance finding a contractor to complete fire restoration of a post frame building.

DEAR POLE BARN GURU: Good day PBG, I have a huge old wooden beam barn currently covered with standing seam tin roofing. I thought that would be the best to keep. However, it seems I have to have it painted more frequently and expensively than I planned.

Would it make sense to change the type of roofing?  Perhaps 50 year residential house shingling? There are so many good roofers competing for that business, I think I can have it done relatively cheaply. What about the new membranes I see on the market?

I value your thoughts on this.

Thank you for your consideration

JOHN in WASHINGTON D.C.

DEAR JOHN: Good afternoon. Something is wrong with your existing roofing or it has been on for many years as it should not have to be repainted.

For economy and durability I would recommend using through screwed 29 gauge three foot wide panels with Kynar paint (for any color other than White).

Shingled roofs are probably not what you think they should be: https://www.hansenpolebuildings.com/2018/10/ask-the-builder/

I would need more clarification from you on “membranes”.

DEAR POLE BARN GURU: Hi there!! I am a single mom with 1 daughter. I want to build a pole barn house on my mom’s land. My price range is about 100k and I have about 20k to put down. I know absolutely nothing about building a home and especially nothing about a pole barn home. I am hoping I can spend less money on the outside and be able put more money on the inside to have the amenities and design/layout that I want. Where do I even begin?

THANK YOU FOR ANY HELP YOU CAN OFFER!!

JELEE in JOPLIN

DEAR JALEE: You have come to the right place. Our team members at Hansen Pole Buildings are barndominium experts. Links in this article will get you started: https://www.hansenpolebuildings.com/2019/10/show-me-your-barndominium-plans-please/

Plan tips – consider these factors:

Direction of access (you don’t want to have to drive around your house to get to garage doors)

‘Curb appeal’ – what will people see as they drive up?

Any views?

North-south alignment – place no or few windows on north wall, lots on south wall
Overhang on south wall to shade windows from mid-day summer sun If your AC bill is far greater than your heating bill, reverse this and omit or minimize north overhangs.

Slope of site

 

DEAR POLE BARN GURU: Hello, I’m in need of someone to make a repair to a shop bay that received some fire damage. It’s located in Columbia, Tn. just an hour south west of Nashville. Do you some one that can make repairs on these metal over wood frame buildings? Someone I could set up a meeting with to get a quote?

Thanks DAVID in COLUMBIA

DEAR DAVID: You are nearly neighbors with our oldest daughter Bailey who lives in Shelbyville!

If you respond with photos of your building damage and a contact phone number we can post it up for members of Hansen Pole Buildings’ independent Builder Network to contact you directly. These builders are not affiliated with Hansen Pole Buildings and it is totally up to you to properly vet them out: https://www.hansenpolebuildings.com/2018/04/vetting-building-contractor/

 

 

 

Barndominium on a Daylight Basement

As post frame construction moves into a world filled with barndominiums, shouses and homes, there are of course those who would prefer (or need due to lot slope) to build upon either a full or partial (daylight) basement.

Post frame buildings are ideal for this situation.

Reader LOUIE writes:

“Hi, I just started the process of building my first home and came across your website, hoping maybe you can help. So far I have purchased the land, got the septic design and have started to clear it. I have a good idea of what I would like to build but have a few questions. Can you design buildings to be built on daylight basement foundations? Also I see that the kits on your website include the windows, doors and exterior finish. Would it be possible to buy a kit for just the the framing?  Ideally I want to build something like this roughly 28×36. Thanks and look forward to hearing from you.”

Mike the Pole Barn Guru responds:

Yes, we can design to build on a daylight basement, columns on the basement’s open side would be long enough to extend into the ground and be embedded. My shouse (shop/house) in Washington was engineered this way. In my case we dealt with 12 feet of grade change on a 40 foot wide site. Our solution was to have a 12’ tall ICF block wall on one side and 10 feet of front, then step down across the rear endwall to follow grade. Engineered wet set brackets were poured into top of ICFs (read about wet set brackets here: https://www.hansenpolebuildings.com/2019/05/sturdi-wall-plus-concrete-brackets/).

Besides your framing package, we would like to provide your building’s steel roofing. If you are using some sort of board or plank siding, we would like for you to obtain it and we would provide OSB or plywood sheathing as well as a Weather Resistant Barrier.

We would need to have some wall at the corners of the window end in order to adequately transfer shear loads from roof to foundation. Ideally for a 10′ tall wall, roughly 3.5′ at the corners.

To achieve your vaulted ceiling as shown in the photo, the best method would be to place a column at peak 12′ in from each endwall. If your interior plans cannot stand columns, we could run a ridge beam down the center from end to end.

If you do opt for interior columns, I would also recommend using engineered prefabricated floor trusses for your floor system. This would provide a clearspan lower level and allow for all ductwork and utilities to be hidden in your home’s floor.

For extended reading on barndominium floor trusses please see: https://www.hansenpolebuildings.com/2020/01/floor-trusses-for-barndominiums/

Building Codes Apply to Shouses

Building Codes Apply to Shouses

Recently I shared with you, my faithful readers, a Park Rapids Enterprise article penned by Lorie R. Skarpness as Nevis, Minnesota attempts to deal with a shouse.

https://www.hansenpolebuildings.com/2019/12/a-shouse-in-the-news/

Below is Lorie’s update from January 18, 2020:

“The discussion of a proposed shouse (a word that means a shop with living quarters inside) that began at the December Nevis council meeting was continued at their Jan. 13 Nevis meeting.

Planning commissioner Dawn Rouse shared a report from the city’s planning commission about discussion of shouses from their December meeting.

Their consensus was that any requirements should apply to all residences and not single out one specific type, noting that the Minnesota Building Code already addresses many of potential issues. The city also has a building inspector who determines whether a proposed building meets code.

Council member Jeanne Thompson said the way the building code is written is vague and open to interpretation.

“People up here don’t go and buy expensive plans with these beautiful entryways for their shops for the most part,” she said. “They do it themselves. That’s where I think something needs to be addressed so we don’t have industrial and “garageish” looking buildings in a residential neighborhood.”

Concerns about the building material of the shouse were brought up by council member Rich Johnson. “I don’t want something that looks like a pole barn built right next to me because I don’t know if someone would want to move into that neighborhood.”

“We can set more stringent regulations than what is in the building code regarding materials used and things like that if that’s what you want to do,” Rouse said, pointing out that Walker has residential performance standards stating corrugated metal is not to be used on exterior finishes.

Thompson asked Rouse to bring information on existing residential regulations to share at the February 10 council meeting.”

Where their council members get confused is Building Codes address structural components, not aesthetics (such as colors or exterior covering materials). Post frame shouses and barndominiums are Building Code conforming structures. What any jurisdiction can do is to set aesthetic requirements, however they need to be applied equally across all building systems of an Occupancy Classification.

Is a jurisdiction resistant to your proposed barndominium, shouse or post frame home? If so, provide me with specifics and chances are pretty well close to 100% I can assist with a positive resolution.

Raised Floors in Post Frame Homes

Raised Floors Are an Opportunity for Post Frame Homes

Three months after Hurricane Harvey churned through Texas, dumping 51 inches of rain and damaging an estimated 150,000 homes, the state’s most populous county took a bureaucratic step which has huge implications for how it will deal with the risk of future flooding.

On December 5, Harris County, which surrounds the City of Houston, approved an overhaul of its flood rules expanding them from 100-year floodplains—which have a one percent change of flooding in a given year—to 500-year floodplains. The new rules (which don’t apply inside Houston city limits) will compel people building houses in some areas to elevate them up to eight feet higher than before.

“We had 30,000 houses that flooded” from Harvey, said county engineer John Blount, who put forward the rule changes. Before the floodwaters even subsided, hundreds of county employees fanned out to survey the damage. “We went to every one of those houses and figured out how much water got in them, and then we did a statistical analysis,” Blount said.
The data was geocoded, factoring in location and neighborhood conditions, and one result was the increased elevation rule. (The county is also buying out 200 of the most vulnerable homes and hopes to buy out thousands more, but those represent a small fraction of the homes inside the floodplain.)

Harris County’s new rules are the most stringent flood-related development restrictions anywhere in the United States, according to Blount. If a future Harvey-sized deluge comes, almost all the homes in the area will be safe, he said: “Had that same event happened, at the same location but [with houses] built to the new standard, 95 percent or more would not have flooded.”

For a structure, standing water is a fearsome enemy. Even a small amount of flooding in a home can exile its inhabitants for weeks and require costly repairs. After Harvey, tens of thousands of evacuees lived in hotels or with friends as workers in their homes tore out drywall to prevent the spread of mold, which can sicken residents. And more Harveys are coming: As Robinson Meyer reported, a new MIT study concludes Harvey-scale flooding in Texas is six times as likely now as it was in the late 20th century, and will only get more likely as this century wears on.

More than a million people live in the 100- and 500-year flood zones across the Houston area, and hundreds of thousands more do in other U.S. cities, including Miami and New York. Harris County’s move conforms with the advice of building engineers, climate experts, and the insurance industry. If you live in an area which is prone to flooding—or will be soon—getting off the ground is the best way to avoid recurring, expensive, and heart-rending damage to your house.

“There’s no real substitute for elevation. That’s your best bet,” said Tim Reinhold, senior vice president and chief engineer of the Insurance Institute for Business and Home Safety (IBHS), a research organization based in Tampa and funded by insurers.
Houses don’t have an engineered safety margin for avoiding flooding the way they do for wind resistance, Reinhold points out; even a few inches of water can be devastating. His advice: “Build that margin in by going higher.” The IBHS recommends elevating houses three or more feet above the 100-year floodplain.

Yet three feet is nowhere near standard. The City of Houston requires one foot of elevation above the 100-year floodplain. Many jurisdictions in Texas and other states require none. What seems like a simple, obvious safeguard raises tricky questions: How high is high enough? Who has to pay for it? And at what point does it no longer make sense to build in a place at all?
Nationwide, according to Census data, 59 percent of new single-family homes are “slab-on-grade,” as it’s known in the construction industry. The technique is pretty much what it sounds like: Concrete is poured into a mold set shallowly into the ground, forming a slab several inches thick. Because a ground freeze can crack the slab, the method is mainly used in warmer climates. It’s straightforward and cheap. But it results in a house with a low elevation, which is obviously not ideal in a flood zone. “I don’t understand why you would ever build a house on a slab on grade that could be in a flood-prone area,” Barcik said.
Building a house with a raised foundation isn’t cheap. “If you’re starting with a home that’s slab-on-grade right now, and want to raise it by using fill, it could be $13,000 to $14,000 to do that just one foot,” said Gary Ehrlich, the director of construction codes and standards for the National Association of Home Builders.

Mike the Pole Barn Guru comments:
The fill method—trucking in soil and resting the slab on top of it—is cheaper than the pier-and-beam or stem-wall options. But it’s not adequate for raising a house’s height by several feet. The eight-foot-elevated homes now required in parts of Harris County would carry significant added costs, which builders would pass on to homebuyers.

However, elevating a post frame home, even as much as eight feet, is a negligible investment compared to the costs of stick frame construction. Considering constructing a new home? If so, look towards post frame construction as an affordable design solution.

How to Keep the Water Out of a Pole Building

How to Keep the Water Out of a Pole Barn

The post frame (pole barn) building has moved from the farm to suburbia. With the transition in building uses, having water flowing into a post frame business or residence is far less than desirable.

Dear Pole Barn Guru: My parents lived in a pole barn “lodge”. When there was a lot of snow and it blew against the building, as it melted water would get in under the walls. Grading was away from the building. Was the slab not poured high enough? Is there a way to seal bottom during construction that maybe wasn’t done properly? We want to have a pole barn home built, but need to educate ourselves on these details to make sure the work is done properly. Carolyn in Cleveland

Mike the Pole Barn Guru answers:

My bride and I happen to live in a post frame home in South Dakota, where in both snows and blows. Our building also has a huge footprint, being 84 feet wide and 60 feet deep. A six inch snowfall easily results in a berm along each side several feet in height.

For our slab on grade building, we made sure to have some serious slope away from all four sides of the structure.

From the 2015 IBC (International Building Code):

“1804.4 Site grading.

The ground immediately adjacent to the foundation shall be sloped away from the building at a slope of not less than one unit vertical in 20 units horizontal (5-percent slope) for a minimum distance of 10 feet measured perpendicular to the face of the wall. If physical obstructions or lot lines prohibit 10 feet of horizontal distance, a 5-percent slope shall be provided to an approved alternative method of diverting water away from the foundation. Swales used for this purpose shall be sloped a minimum of 2 percent where located within 10 feet of the building foundation. Impervious surfaces within 10 feet of the building foundation shall be sloped a minimum of 2 percent away from the building.

Exception: Where climactic or soil conditions warrant, the slope of the ground away from the building foundation shall be permitted to be reduced to not less than one unit vertical in 48 units horizontal (2-percent slope).”

Regardless of siding type, a high quality and well-sealed building wrap (https://www.hansenpolebuildings.com/2012/11/house-wrap/) should be placed under the siding with the bottom edge at the bottom of the siding.

With steel siding, inside closures (https://www.hansenpolebuildings.com/2015/12/the-lowly-inside-closure/) can be placed between the building wrap and the steel siding to fill the voids created by the high ribs of the steel siding.

For residential purposes, I would strongly encourage the use of a raised wood floor over a crawl space as a living surface. It will add to comfort and should pretty well eliminate any potential for water infiltration around the base of the living area.

 

Looking for a Contractor to Build a Post Frame Home

More and more consumers are seeing the practicality, unique architectural and energy savings advantages as well as cost savings from a post frame home. This includes loyal reader Brian who writes:

Engineer sealed pole barnHello, my wife and I are considering building a post frame home. We contacted a designer who actually had plans for a home that is close to what we were wanting. He suggested it may be difficult to find a builder that would be comfortable building a pole barn home – so that is why I am contacting several builders to develop a list that could be considered in the future if we move in this direction.

Please find the attached plans he provided as a reference and let me know if this is a project you would be willing to tackle. Although we have not bought land we are currently looking in Warren and Clinton counties in Ohio.

Dear Brian: Thank you very much for your interest in a new Hansen Pole Building. We design and provide building plans, installation instructions and materials for totally custom post frame buildings. Your proposed plan (as would be any other plan) is totally doable as a post frame (pole barn) home.

What we do not do is build. Our buildings are designed for the average do-it-yourselfer to successfully construct their own beautiful building, which is why the majority of our clients do their own work. Those who construct themselves, end up with a far better finished result than what you would get from any builder.

In the event you do hire a builder (technically an erector), any builder who can and will read and follow the plans and instructions should prove capable of doing a satisfactory job. Given your geographic location, just a caution based upon experience – there are members of a well know religious group which construct many post frame buildings in your area of the country. While their prices sound too good to be true, it is our experience they do not always build to the provided plans or follow instructions. Again, just a caution. Otherwise a capable erector should be able to construct the building shell for about 50% of what your investment in the materials is.

About Hansen BuildingsI am not normally a fan of “canned” plans for any type of construction, as they are rarely going to meet with the true needs of the client. My best advice is always going to be to determine the spaces needed, determine how large each of those spaces need to be. A good way to find the right size of rooms is to take a note pad, writing tool, and a tape measure and start visiting open houses and home tours.

Once room needs and sizes have been determined, starting putting the pieces of the jigsaw puzzle together – place rooms where they are most efficiently grouped for ease of access and use. This may take some adjustments of individual room dimensions, however the resultant will be the most effective. Now, and only now, should you put the “box” around the contents!

 

 

Consider Post Frame for New Home!

DEAR POLE BARN GURU: Good morning. My name is Thomas and I am with xxxxxx; we manufacture metal roofing and siding and based out of Tennessee. I wanted to ask you a few questions to gain some information. First, my wife and I are starting to look at metal building for our new home, is this something your company is licensed to do in the state of Tennessee; second, I also would like to know if you manufacture your own metal roofing and siding, or if it is purchased from another company. Hope you had a great Christmas and I look forward to hearing back from you. THOMAS in MURFREESBORO

DEAR THOMAS: Thank you for your inquiry. Hansen Pole Buildings provides engineered post frame buildings in all 50 states, including Tennessee. Post frame (pole) building homes have become quite popular in the past few years and chances are excellent we can provide a customized building shell which will ideally meet with your needs and budget. We outsource our metal roofing and siding and we can provide the building sans roofing and siding in the event you should wish to provide your own.

DEAR POLE BARN GURU: I have submitted a request for a quote on our residence but I’ve needed to make a few modifications. How important is post spacing on a residential post frame building? The residence I’m designing is based on nominal 8′ post spacing but with the interior design I have, a couple of the posts interfere with window/door placement. I’ve been assuming that as long as opposite side posts are aligned so that the trusses are supported, the post position can be varied somewhat. On our design, I’ve assumed nominal 8′ post spacing but actual spacing winds up being as close as 7′ and as wide as 10′ 6″. Can irregular post spacing be accommodated or do I need to modify our interior design? Thanks LONNIE in COLORADO SPRINGS

DEAR LONNIE: Your assumption, “as long as opposite side posts are aligned so that the trusses are supported, the post position can be varied somewhat” is absolutely correct. In most circumstancing having the sidewall columns spaced at 12 foot on center is your most economical, so anything at this spacing or less should not be an issue from an engineering and design standpoint. When you arrive at an ideal spacing, please make sure it is listed on any quotes and invoices, otherwise there is always the possibility of columns being reorganized to the most cost effective combination.

DEAR POLE BARN GURU: Is there a recommended distance from the peak of a roof that the top purlin is installed, and why? WILL in NEWPORT

DEAR WILL: Yes there is a recommended distance. Here is the applicable excerpt from the Hansen Pole Buildings’ Construction Manual:

With standard steel ridge caps, the ridge purlin “uphill” side can be no closer to peak than five inches. This may result in space between ridge purlin and next purlin “downhill” being decreased. Ridge purlins can be further from truss peak than the minimum distances, without negatively affecting building. Roof ridge caps attach to roof steel with metal-to-metal screws, not to ridge purlins, so ridge purlins need not align with future ridge cap fastener locations.

If ridge purlins are “uphill” further than this, roof steel may not have an adequate overhang at eave and challenging situations will result!”