Tag Archives: vaulted ceiling

Barndominium on a Daylight Basement

As post frame construction moves into a world filled with barndominiums, shouses and homes, there are of course those who would prefer (or need due to lot slope) to build upon either a full or partial (daylight) basement.

Post frame buildings are ideal for this situation.

Reader LOUIE writes:

“Hi, I just started the process of building my first home and came across your website, hoping maybe you can help. So far I have purchased the land, got the septic design and have started to clear it. I have a good idea of what I would like to build but have a few questions. Can you design buildings to be built on daylight basement foundations? Also I see that the kits on your website include the windows, doors and exterior finish. Would it be possible to buy a kit for just the the framing?  Ideally I want to build something like this roughly 28×36. Thanks and look forward to hearing from you.”

Mike the Pole Barn Guru responds:

Yes, we can design to build on a daylight basement, columns on the basement’s open side would be long enough to extend into the ground and be embedded. My shouse (shop/house) in Washington was engineered this way. In my case we dealt with 12 feet of grade change on a 40 foot wide site. Our solution was to have a 12’ tall ICF block wall on one side and 10 feet of front, then step down across the rear endwall to follow grade. Engineered wet set brackets were poured into top of ICFs (read about wet set brackets here: https://www.hansenpolebuildings.com/2019/05/sturdi-wall-plus-concrete-brackets/).

Besides your framing package, we would like to provide your building’s steel roofing. If you are using some sort of board or plank siding, we would like for you to obtain it and we would provide OSB or plywood sheathing as well as a Weather Resistant Barrier.

We would need to have some wall at the corners of the window end in order to adequately transfer shear loads from roof to foundation. Ideally for a 10′ tall wall, roughly 3.5′ at the corners.

To achieve your vaulted ceiling as shown in the photo, the best method would be to place a column at peak 12′ in from each endwall. If your interior plans cannot stand columns, we could run a ridge beam down the center from end to end.

If you do opt for interior columns, I would also recommend using engineered prefabricated floor trusses for your floor system. This would provide a clearspan lower level and allow for all ductwork and utilities to be hidden in your home’s floor.

For extended reading on barndominium floor trusses please see: https://www.hansenpolebuildings.com/2020/01/floor-trusses-for-barndominiums/

Barndominium is Popping Up Everywhere

Back in 1981 Barbara Mandrell recorded and released a hit song written by Kye Fleming and Dennis Morgan, “I Was Country When Country Wasn’t Cool”. Well Barbara certainly has it over me in the looks department and I doubt I will ever have a Top Ten hit with, “I Had a Barndominium When Barndominiums Weren’t Cool”.

Read more about barndominium here: https://www.hansenpolebuildings.com/2014/02/barndominium/.

My first personal barndominium, built in 1994, was actually more of a shouse – a 40 feet wide by 36 feet deep, but not rectangular, post frame building! Seriously, it was built as a parallelogram 14 degrees out of square to follow property lines of a very narrow lot. Shop portion is on the ground floor – a garage level with three overhead steel sectional doors 9’ wide x 8’ tall, 10’ wide x 11’ tall and 8’ wide x 7’ tall. I would never recommend the latter of these for an automobile, but it works superbly for motorcycles and our log splitter.

Gambrel roof pole barnThis building is entirely clearspan – no interior columns to have to work around. Second floor has a 10 foot wide step-down by four feet. This area has its own vaulted ceiling at a 7/12 slope and is used for exercise equipment. With a series of nine windows overlooking a beautiful lake, it takes one’s mind off the agonies of treadmilling and lifting weights.

Upper level is only 30 foot by 36 foot, however it has a vaulted ceiling with a 4/12 interior slope. Another set of nine windows for lake view and a cantilevered deck facing eastward – perfect for a BBQ, with access from a sliding glass patio door.

A June 11, 2019 article by Becky Bracken and provided by www.realtor.com tells a story of bardominiums for sale from coast-to-coast: https://m.chron.com/realestate/article/Barndominiums-Blooming-The-Popular-Style-Is-13967497.php.

Ready to make your custom home dreams into an affordable reality? Then a post frame barndominium or shouse might be exactly what you need. Call 1(866)200-9657 to discuss your wants and needs with a Hansen Buildings’ Designer today.

Post Frame Scissor Trusses

Post Frame Scissor Trusses

I’d spent summers working for my dad and uncles framing buildings and being low man when it came to a totem pole of laborers, I did my fair share of strong back, weak mind work – such as setting trusses. As a teenager, I had not given much thought to complexities involved in engineering trusses. I just knew they could do things we could not possibly stick frame. They made jobsite building assembly go quicker, as long as trusses were correct (a gamble from some manufacturers then).

When I was newly introduced to prefabricated roof trusses as a sawyer back before many of you readers were born (1977), my eyes were opened to an entire world of structural possibilities. My truss buddy Bret Hansen and I were so obsessed with being best truss builders ever, so we spent our own time nights and weekends going to view our trusses upon buildings under construction. We saw slightly sloped commercial trusses, steep sloped trusses, hips, valleys and scissor trusses.

I’ve written about scissor trusses before, with https://www.hansenpolebuildings.com/2016/10/scissors-trusses-post-frame-buildings/ being one of my favorites.

Reader JIM in GRAND RAPIDS triggered today’s musings when he wrote: “Can a pole barn have a vaulted/cathedral ceiling? I have been told NO by one pole barn builder only to see references to using scissor trusses in pole buildings on the Internet. Thank you, GURU, for clearing this up.”

Mike the Pole Barn Guru responds:

Reality check – over half of all builders did not graduate from high school. In this we are talking about a big pool of builders, where those making up a pie piece segment known as pole barn builders may (from personal experience) be even less educated. The builder who told you no, frankly just doesn’t know. Chances are fairly good, if it can be done it wood, it can be incorporated into a post frame (pole barn) building.

25 years ago I had built for myself a rather unique post frame building. Located upon the back portion of our steeply sloped Newman Lake, Washington lot, it’s a one of a kind structure.. Interested readers can find out just a bit more about this building here:  https://www.hansenpolebuildings.com/2012/02/grade-change/.

When my younger brother Mark and I were but tykes, we were introduced to a noble game, ping pong (aka table tennis) by our mother’s dad – Grandpa Boyd. We’d play for hours in their duplex basement, where a low ceiling caused many shots to be caromed off.

In designing my new building, I wanted to make provision for an upper level to be able to be a general purpose rec room, where my then young (now all grown and gone) children could play ping pong without challenges posed by our grandparents’ low ceiling. A solution was as simple as scissor trusses.

In order to match existing house and detached garage rooflines, a 7/12 roof slope was utilized. This lent nicely to being able to have a 4/12 interior scissor truss slope. With a width of 30 feet, room center height approaches 13 feet – plenty enough to do some lobbing with a ping pong ball!

So yes, Jim, you certainly can have a vaulted/cathedral ceiling!