Tag Archives: pole barn financing

Financing, Vapor Barrier, and Boat Storage

This Friday’s daily blog will feature three questions and answers from the Pole Barn Guru. First is a question about financing, followed by a question about a vapor barrier for an add-on lean-to, and then building a quite lengthy boat storage facility.

DEAR POLE BARN GURU: Hi there. I’m looking to utilize a VA loan for 10 acres of property in West Texas. However, as a requirement, there must be a livable structure built with electrical and AC.

It was always our intention to build a pole barn or barndominium on the property but with the requirement of having such in place to qualify, we now need to consider doing this as part of the loan process.

So, my question really is, do people typically DIY with these barn kits or do they hire to build? I believe we’ll have to hire to build but I’m not sure who to contact or what is decent pricing for a build outside of the kit. I’m making a basic assumption of a 40 x 40 kit with 12 – 15 tall ceilings and basic foundation. We would convert it as a living space with insulation and electric as well during the process. We do intend on also building two separate living areas along with it in the future and then using the larger area for Entertainment.

Any guidance would be extremely helpful. Thank you! CORY in HURST

DEAR CORY: Obviously you are finding some challenges when it comes to being able to utilize your VA benefits: https://www.hansenpolebuildings.com/2020/08/va-loans-for-a-pole-barn-residence/


I would say our barndominium clients are pretty much evenly split between those who erect their own shells and those who hire it done. In order to get your best possible appraisal value to cash outlay – DIYing as much as possible will be to your advantage. A fair price to erect your shell is usually about 50% of what your investment is into your building kit.

 

DEAR POLE BARN GURU: We are adding a 30×60 lean to shop area to out existing 40×60 insulated pole barn. I have been told a hundred different ways to insulate it, but my biggest concern for tomorrow is I have to make a decision. I pre built all of the walls and they are ready to go up. I am getting so much conflicting advice. We are connecting to the pole barn. (Yes it has been engineered)! Do I need to put a vapor barrier, vapor retardant, or any material against the existing outside wall that will become an inside wall? I have a crew coming over to help carry the walls and stand them up. I do have a couple of other questions, but this is the most pressing.

So my husband is really sleeping as I type this. It is midnight. He works late and has to get up early and I am up trying to research for him. When I read your story about you and your wife it reminded me of my husband and myself. We have worked on a lot of projects together.

Thank you in advance. JOLENE in WICHITA

DEAR JOLEEN: Kudos to you for having an engineered building! Just so much more prudent than not.


If your lean to and existing pole building are both conditioned then your inside wall needs no vapor barrier or retarder. Your new outside walls will need something however what it is will depend upon how you plan upon insulating.

Ask The Pole Barn GuruDEAR POLE BARN GURU: I’m looking to put in a boat storage facility, it will be 30′ wide by 600′ long and 15′ tall. What do I need to look at? GREG in PERRY

DEAR GREG: Column spacing will depend upon whether you are stacking boats (https://www.hansenpolebuildings.com/2018/09/boat-storage-pole-barns/) or placing them individually in bays. For 600′ in length, you will need to have interior shearwalls running 30′ direction probably no less than every 120 feet along your length. One of our Building Designers will be reaching out to you Monday to further discuss your needs and best design.

 

 

 

 

Mike the Pole Barn Guru’s World

Mike the Pole Barn Guru’s World

Pole Barn Guru BlogWhen I began this blog back in June of 2011, I surmised getting to a total of 100 articles would be a stretch, but yet a worthy goal. Well, I have surprised even myself… welcome to article number 1500! What amazes even me – how many possible topics have yet to be written about.

Today, you get taken to Hansen Pole Buildings’ back room – where we actually have developed an outline for our Building Designers to follow with new clients. I share portions of this for many reasons, amongst them:

#1 In hopes competitors will read it and learn, in doing so everyone wins. Clients get buildings better serving their needs, competition has happier clients and our industry looks even better. I have always believed if all providers of post frame building kit packages played by a similar set of rules: 1. Every building should be designed by a RDP, i.e. Registered Design Professional, engineer or architect, specifically for a specific client at their specific building site. No getting one sealed drawing and using it for multiple clients.  2. We will figure out how to design your post frame building most efficiently, most cost effectively and with a higher level of service

#2 By being better prepared with information we (or any true high quality post frame building supplier) need, you (future new building owner) will have a smoother journey from planning to occupancy

“Delivering the Ultimate Post Frame Experience™” to every Hansen Pole Buildings’ client, every day.

Hansen Pole Buildings has most of our clients first contact us via an internet inquiry. If so, your information has automatically been entered into our database. First thing – I go to your record and see if you have subscribed to our newsletter series.

If you are reading this and are not a Hansen Pole Buildings’ newsletter subscriber, go do so now.  They are totally free and you may unsubscribe any time. A sign up link can be found in footer (bottom) of each page of our website. These newsletters are not designed to sell anyone, anything – they are meant to be entertaining and informative. You can read more about them here: https://www.hansenpolebuildings.com/2011/10/pole-building-newsletters/.

For competitors – I encourage you to subscribe also, read them, edit them to fit your own business model and make them available to your clients. Informed clients make for happy post frame building owners.

Next you receive a personal email. When it comes down to it, there exist these four most important points when it comes to making a major investment:

     1)A fair value for money and time invested;

     2) It solves problem(s) or helps to achieve a goal;

     3) Liking and trusting those you are dealing with;

     4) Ability to get delivery within a reasonable time frame.

I encourage potential clients to take advantage of available financing options: https://www.hansenpolebuildings.com/financing/.

All are also directed to contact their appropriate Planning Department to find out if they are allowed to construct the building they want, where they want it (this step helps to avoid anyone wasting time or having hurt feelings): https://www.hansenpolebuildings.com/2013/01/planning-department-3/.

Next up – an email about Exposure C for wind. Pretty much universally most post frame building kit package suppliers and post frame builders quote buildings with an Exposure B, although a great many sites should have buildings designed for a more conservative Exposure C.

For more Exposure C reading: https://www.hansenpolebuildings.com/blog/2011/11/wind_exposure/

https://www.hansenpolebuildings.com/blog/2012/03/wind-exposure-confusion/.

We all live in a world of social media. I want you to know about me and I want to know about you. We do business with people we trust and are our friends. I’ve had some individual post frame client relationships for decades, as it should be. I want to be your Facebook friend, in your circles at Google Plus, and a Linkedin connection. If you use Skype it adds yet another method for us to stay in contact.

Lastly and most important, I want you and I to talk. Although you might believe you really know what you want in a new post frame building, I might have some thoughts and ideas you have not yet considered and no one else has suggested. Once I have gathered information from you during a conversation, I will often ask if you mind if I design your building if it was my own building. My mission in this – to come up with a best possible design solution for you, balancing investment and budget.I have saved clients hundreds of thousands of dollars on their new pole buildings by tweaking their initial design, from changing bay spacings to type of doors or windows. Why would I do this? My goal is to design a building which solves the problem. In other words, a building which is functional, is pleasing to the customer, and fits their budget.  

Welcome to the world of Mike the Pole Barn Guru!

 

 

 

How to Get Pole Building Financing

Welcome to Ask the Pole Barn Guru – where you can ask questions about building topics, with answers posted on Mondays.  With many questions to answer, please be patient to watch for yours to come up on a future Monday segment.  If you want a quick answer, please be sure to answer with a “reply-able” email address.

Email all questions to: PoleBarnGuru@HansenPoleBuildings.com

 DEAR POLE BARN GURU: Good afternoon: If I were to purchase a pole barn through your company would I get pole building financing through you? Or would I get a loan through a local bank? Please advise

Thank you for your help MARINA

DEAR MARINA: Thank you very much for your interest. You can actually do either one. For options on pole building financing through our sources: https://www.hansenpolebuildings.com/financing/

Mike the Pole Barn Guru

DEAR POLE BARN GURU: I would like to know if y’all had some kind of payment plan or if I had to pay the whole cost of a new garage up front? MATT

DEAR MATT: Thank you very much for your interest in a new Hansen Pole Building. It is not necessary to pay for the whole cost of your new building up front. We have numerous pole building financing plans available, depending upon your credit worthiness. Please visit https://www.hansenpolebuildings.com/financing/ to apply.

Mike the Pole Barn Guru

DEAR POLE BARN GURU: Good Morning, I am hoping to get more information on building a small, single story storage shed sized at 10’ x 40’. If you could send me any spec information about the building materials or any other information pertaining to building a storage shed that size, that would be great. Thank you, DIANA

DEAR DIANA: Thank you very much for your interest in a new Hansen Pole Building. We have a plethora of information available on our website. A good starting point would be to download our Product Guide: https://www.hansenpolebuildings.com/product-guide/ and to sign up for our newsletters: https://www.hansenpolebuildings.com/pole-building-newsletter/

As you beginning seriously planning your new pole building, this will be helpful to you: https://www.hansenpolebuildings.com/pole-barn-planning-guide.

All Hansen Buildings are custom designed, so whenever you are prepared to begin formulating a budget, feel free to request a quote at: https://www.hansenpolebuildings.com/freequote/

where one of the Hansen Buildings’ Designers can assist you towards the building of your dreams.

Mike the Pole Barn Guru

DEAR POLE BARN GURU: I have a 24’x40’x16′ pole barn that has the bubble wrap insulation. But it doesn’t provide much during the winters. What can I put on the walls and ceiling to keep it warmer in the barn? Spray foam cost way too much? JASON IN HENRYVILLE

DEAR JASON: Reflective insulation (aka “bubble wrap”) is a great product when utilized for what it is best as – a thermal break to prevent condensation issues on the inside of steel roofing and siding.

If you have a product with reflective aluminum facing on the exterior – it will also aid against heat gain. What it is NOT going to do is afford much resistance to heat loss.

The majority of heat loss is up – and where to make the investment first, if on a tight budget. Most pole barn trusses are not designed to support the weight of a ceiling, so we will work with this as an assumption. To add the least amount of weight – attach light weight material which is NOT a vapor barrier (I see chicken wire used frequently) tightly across the bottom chords of the trusses. Unfaced fiberglass blanket insulation can be placed on top of this, between the truss bottom chords. It is available in eight foot wide rolls, which works nicely if your building has trusses spaced eight foot on center.

For your area, a minimum of R-38 would be a starting point. This does create a dead attic space which must be ventilated.

If you do not already have vented eaves and ridge, the only solution is gable vents. https://www.hansenpolebuildings.com/blog/2014/02/pole-building-ventilation/

If your building has sliding doors – climate control will be a perpetual challenge, no matter what you do, they are going to suck out most of any type of heat you try to add. If possible, replace them with insulated overhead doors. https://www.hansenpolebuildings.com/blog/2012/04/climate-control/

Walls can be insulated with the same un-faced insulation which was used in the ceiling (if posts are eight foot on center). Holes will need to be made in the wall reflective insulation, so as not to create a cavity with insulation trapped between two vapor barriers. Attach the insulation to framing at the top of the walls and drape it down between the columns. A vapor barrier needs to be placed on the inside of the insulation and then cover the vapor barrier with gypsum wallboard, plywood, OSB, etc. (all of which will require additional framing to be added).

While it is too late for you – the easiest way to solve these challenges is to prevent them in the beginning by proper design up front. Read how here: https://www.hansenpolebuildings.com/blog/2012/04/climate-controlled/

The 3 Largest Non-Construction Mistakes: Pole Barn Planning

Many people have literally built their own pole buildings – from digging the holes, until the last screw is driven. Some do portions of the work themselves and hire a builder to drive the nails, while others employ a general contractor to do everything for them. Most adore their new buildings. Some are deeply disillusioned.

Before you commit all your time and money to building your “perfect” pole building, check with a Hansen Buildings professional and consider these common pit falls:

Not doing homework in advance…

Pole Barn Planning.

There are rural/remote areas in some states which actually have no building code requirements and no building inspectors. You can take the axles off your fifth wheel or throw a tarp over some straw bales and regard it as home. You could be planning something more serious.

However. Before you ever begin to shop for a price on a pole building, contact your local planning department to find out if permits are required, what their restrictions might be, as well as any building code requirements.

In the event no permit is required, you may want to hire an engineering firm to do inspections on your work during construction. In the event you resell your property, either a Certificate of Occupancy (issued by a building department) or an independent inspection may be required, to assure the building was built properly.

Ignoring financing.

It’s no fun paying daily interest for a building you cannot use. Construction loan interest is generally 3 to 4 times dearer than long-term lending. For instance, if current long term rates are 4%, expect to pay about $30-35 a day in interest for each $100,000 loaned. Construction loans usually have stiff rate rises if not paid back within half a year.

Time is definitely important when building! Plan for the surprising. What happens if your builder finishes on time, but the only inspector is on a two week fishing trip? Your local Building Department won’t be responsible for the additional interest.

Letting the lender set your financial position.

Imagine your lender has pre-qualified you for $350,000. Many people take the number a lender gives them and build primarily based on what they can get instead of what they want. Say they find a bit of land for $75,000 and get a bid from a contractor of $255,000 for a home and a pole building. They’ve picked the location and structure they desire for $330,000. The $20,000 difference between the pre-qualification and the original estimate offends their subconscious.

They’re forced to find another $20,000 in extras and options. What happens if a local employer lays off 1,000 folks during construction and the appraisal for the home and pole barn drops to $345,000? What if interest rates change during construction and now you are qualified for only $340,000? Building to the maximum amount you can borrow is an awful risk. Life is ever changing. One adverse change and you may need to bring an additional $10,000 to closing or perhaps not be able to close!

Avoid these common mistakes by keeping your eyes wide open, taking time for careful pole barn planning (which includes asking a lot of questions), and not succumbing to adding features and options you didn’t need to fill your loan cap.  Do your homework and you will pave the way to a “no-surprise” fast track to your dream pole building.