Tag Archives: Plans

Installation, Plans, and Quotes

This week the Pole Barn Guru answers questions about the installation of a building, plans provide to erect the structure, and a quote for a potential client.

DEAR POLE BARN GURU: Do you offer installation? Not sure I would have help to put it up. 

Thanks JESSICA

DEAR JESSICA: Thank you for your interest in a new Hansen Post Frame building. Our complete post frame building kit packages are designed for an average person who can and will read English to successfully assemble their own beautiful building. We have had clients do nearly every construction process step without any other person to assist them. If you do end up needing an extra pair of hands or more (even complete assembly), capable help is most usually no further away than a free Craigslist ad under “gigs”.

DEAR POLE BARN GURU: Good morning, I hope to be helping a ‘friend of a friend’, get plans ready for a Cracker Barn type home they would like to build. They have never built a home, or even thought about it, but they want to ‘do it their self’ which is not a good plan for a first timer. I have a few of her emails where I see she has reached out to Hansen several times, so I wanted to start here. 

My question is:  Do you have anyone in the Nashville TN area who could oversee her project? I have noticed that some ‘pole barn’ companies do, and some do not.  She would definitely need a ‘do’.

Thank you~ GINGER in NASHVILLE

Engineer sealed pole barnDEAR GINGER: Actually “do it their self” is a perfectly acceptable plan for a first timer – at least as we provide post frame building kit packages. Our plans (view sample plans here: https://www.hansenpolebuildings.com/sample-building-plans/) are detailed down to showing each and every board and connection, our nearly 500 page Construction Manual walks every DIY person through assembly process step by step and includes actual photos. Feeling stuck, unsure or have any other assembly challenge? Hansen Pole Buildings provides free Technical Support to work with clients to guide them around pitfalls.

I have personally been involved with nearly 20,000 successful post frame building projects. One thing in common with each one – there has never been a need for an onsite project overseer. If your friend of a friend can and will read English, they can build for themselves are far nicer finished building than they will get from any building contractor.

 

DEAR POLE BARN GURU: Good afternoon! My husband and I own land in Defiance County, Ohio and have discussed building a residential pole barn. I’ve reviewed your website and am interested in getting more information about your residential pole barns. Could you point me in the right direction as to where to start? Any information you have would be greatly appreciated.

Thank you! AMY in DEFIANCE

DEAR AMY: Please dial 1(866)200-9657 and discuss your wants and needs with a Hansen Pole Buildings Designer.

 

 

Building Over a Basement, an OHD Modification, and Interior Photos?

This week the Pole Barn Guru answers questions about building over a basement, an OHD modification, and interior photos of one of our buildings?

Engineer sealed pole barnDEAR POLE BARN GURU: If I order a pole barn knowing that it will be built over a basement will the plans show how to install the floor or do I have to figure that out myself? I would really like the answer quickly if possible. Thank you. MARYJANE in MANZANOLA

 

DEAR MARYJANE: Our third-party engineer sealed plans include connections of all members we supply in your complete post frame building kit package. This would include how floor would be attached to your basement walls.

DEAR POLE BARN GURU: I have a 18’s by 10’ tall sectional door and need to add a section to be at least 11’-6” tall for a new camper to fit. Trying to find a garage door contractor that can do the modification on the door. I will raise the header and cut the barn metal to fit new section myself. Just wondering if you have a recommendation on a contractor or an opinion. Thanks. RALPH in RAY TOWNSHIP

DEAR RALPH: Before doing a structural remodel of your building, it would be prudent to discuss it with your RDP (Registered Design Professional – engineer or architect) who produced your building’s original design. Making structural changes without their approval could result in voiding any warranty and, at worst, a collapse – just isn’t worth it.

Each sectional door manufacturer has a slightly different panel design. You will need to ascertain whom manufactured your door, then contact them and ask for a referral to dealers closest to you.

As for contractor recommendations, I just will not make them, as if there is a challenge in dealing with them for any reason, chances are I will get blamed – even if I were to tell you to vet them thoroughly.

DEAR POLE BARN GURU: How much is the pole barn shown on the front of this website. Do you, have any interior pictures? https://www.hansenpolebuildings.com/uploads/img_0_5c9bda48b8f54.png

RHONDA in WAVERLY

DEAR WANDA: Thank you very much for your interest in a new Hansen Pole Building. As pictured, this building is $39,999. As we furnish only complete post frame building kit packages, rarely do we have interior photos, however you can configure interior walls wherever you desire, to best meet your particular needs.

 

Eave Lights, Building Plans, and Foundations

Today Mike answers questions about eave lights, drawing building plans, and foundation plans.

DEAR POLE BARN GURU: How to I attach the poly eave lights to the building frame? RUSSELL in BOISE

DEAR RUSSELL: Polycarbonate panels are best predrilled for screw fasteners using a 3/8” bit. Screw pattern for eave lights is same as for sidewall steel.

Drive #10 x 1” white screw fasteners perpendicular to light panel’s surface and tighten moderately. Fastener head and washer/gasket is to sit snugly and fully on panel’s face, without squeezing gasket and distorting washer. Over tightening will distort washer, panel and ruin gasket, causing leaking and panel damage, resulting from undue internal stresses. Tilted fastener insertion will deform washer, damage gasket, cause leakage and originate undue stresses on panel eventually leading to failure. Tighten fasteners by hand or by an adjustable torque power-screwdriver.

Engineer sealed pole barnDEAR POLE BARN GURU: I’m have a question related to the construction of a custom building. I see that you have some sample building plans on your web site. Do you typically produce the plans for the buildings that you construct or do you recommend that a client work with an architect to have plans drawn up before accepting a construction project? If you do recommend that clients provide plans, do you have a list of architects that you prefer to work with?

Thanks in advance, MATTHEW

DEAR MATTHEW: We (Hansen Pole Buildings and our contracted third-party engineers) produce plans for post frame building kit packages we provide. For clients who feel more comfortable working with an architect, we would recommend contracting their services for conceptual work (aesthetics, room layouts and sizes, etc.) and leave structural aspects (permit/construction plans) to our team.

 

DEAR POLE BARN GURU: Do you have any experience with anchoring a building to an existing slab?

I talked with you before about door options, but now have ran into the problem that the building I am going with will now sit on the anchor plates that I had installed in the slab. Just curios if you know what my best options could be for anchor bolts. Thanks. MICHAEL

DEAR MICHAEL: All steel buildings usually do not come with engineering for a foundation. You are going to have to consult with your foundation engineer and get a fix from them, as no one else can legally make this change.

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Residential Pole Barn, Missing Lumber, and Building on Existing Slab

Today the Pole Barn Guru answers questions about plans for a residential pole barn, lumber going missing, and to building an existing slab.

DEAR POLE BARN GURU: Hello, I’m looking to build a residential pole barn. I would need enough space for 3 bedroom 2 bath. How big of a pole barn would I need? CULLEN in ROCHESTER

DEAR CULLEN: It depends upon what sort of spaces you want to live in. I grew up in a home which was just as you describe and only 960 square feet. Conversely, right now I live in a home which has one bedroom, 1-1/2 baths and has 2400 square feet of living space.

I encourage you to go to lots of open houses, take your tape measure and a notebook. When you find rooms feeling comfortable to you, measure them. Consider spaces you need to create for your lifestyle. Don’t short yourself when it comes to closets, storage spaces, etc. Do you need a family room and a living room? Maybe just a great room?

Once you get rough sizes and needed spaces figured out, fit them together like a jigsaw puzzle to make most efficient use of space. Try to minimize hallways as well as travel distances – think about how many trips get made to a laundry room. How many footsteps are taken during those trips between opposite house ends? Place those utility areas where they are most convenient.

When finished, draw a box around your creation and this will give you space you need.

DEAR POLE BARN GURU: What grade lumber should we use for the roof purlins on a pole barn building? It appears we have run very short on our project (I think somebody made off with a bunch during the night)! Prime, #1, #2, etc.???? Building in Northeast Pennsylvania, 4ft OC trusses, purlins spaced 2ft OC. JOEL in DUPONT

DEAR JOEL: Sadly jobsites suffer from a high incidence of pilferage. When I was a post frame building contractor, we did a big project in Northern Idaho. We’d lose nearly a unit of 7/16” OSB every night until we had a fence put up around our materials! Apparently it was an overly friendly neighborhood where everyone shared without asking.

To find out appropriate grade for roof purlins you are short, refer to your engineer sealed plans provided with your building kit package. They will specify size, grade and spacing.

DEAR POLE BARN GURU: I have an existing block and slab detached garage. It is old and well built but smaller than I want and the overhead doors are on the wrong face for my purpose. I would like to replace this 24×24 structure with a 36×60 pole barn. Removing that much concrete and then replacing it will add a good bit of cost and time to the project. Would it be possible to use the existing slab and foundation for the posts that would be on it using brackets and the rest of the posts set more traditionally in concrete or using piers and wet set brackets? ROB in ANNAPOLIS

DEAR ROB: Provided your existing concrete has adequacy to support your new building, it would be possible to use dry set anchors to mount columns in those areas. If any doubts about adequacy, you should consult with a RDP (Registered Design Professional – architect or engineer) who can evaluate your situation in person. For cost and ease of construction, I would typically recommend balance of columns being placed in augered holes.

 

Reduce Heat, Garage Kits, and Updates to Aging Building

Reduce Heat, Garage Kits, and Updates to Aging Building

DEAR POLE BARN GURU: I’m looking to build a 40×48 monitor style barn with a 16×48 loft in the center. I don’t plan to heat or cool the loft but would like to reduce the heat in the summer. My first plan is to use a light color or Galvalume for roof metal. My second idea and where I need more advice is on insulating the roof. I was thinking about first laying down foam board insulation and then putting metal roof down. I’m sure there are issues with this option please help me out. I also want to use the insulation to help deaden the sound when it’s raining. MICHAEL in ENTERPRISE

Wood Horse BarnDEAR MICHAEL: Many different colors of “cool roof” steel are now available, which adds far more flexibility in aesthetics – one is no longer limited to bare Galvalume or galvanized, or white- https://www.hansenpolebuildings.com/selecting-building-colors/
Foam board insulation between the roof purlins and the steel roofing would be one of the worst possible choices you could make, from a structural standpoint. It allows for the roof screws to flex within the thickness of the insulation, creating leaks and reducing the strength of the roof steel to resist wind shear. Some other options would range from installing a radiant reflective barrier under the roof steel, or (better yet, although more expensive) using closed cell spray foam insulation.

DEAR POLE BARN GURU: Hello, I am interested in one of the garage kits I found on The Home Depot’s website. I would like to see floor plans and interior dimensions for this kit. And what size would a cement pad need to be to fit under this structure? 48ftx60ft? Hope to hear back soon. Thank you! DAYNA in EAST TEXAS

DEAR DAYNA: The beauty of post frame buildings is a concrete slab is not required in order to support the building. As to floor plans – unless otherwise requested by a client, most post frame buildings are clearspan structures, without any interior columns or partitions. This allows for the total flexibility to place walls wherever one chooses, if any. The quickest way to hear back soon is to include an email address to send responses to.

 

DEAR POLE BARN GURU: Hello. We are starting to look into getting some new insulation and facing put in our shop. The current product is at least 15-20 years old. We were going to just carefully wipe down the dirty putter facing and postpone this project for another year or two, but that job in itself quickly became a hassle. As we are currently looking into which insulation and facing we will replace it with, we are trying to figure out what kind of insulation facing was originally put on that we have right now. The facing itself is exposed on the walls and ceiling besides the first 8’ of wall cover at the bottom. Do you know of any way to determine what type of facing we have? I attached a few pictures of it in case you might be able to help out with any guesses…

Thanks a lot for your help! JON in HANOVER

DEAR JON: Your metal building insulation has a WMP-10 facing, which is generally used in a typical metal building application where the walls are exposed to light to moderate traffic. It obtains a mid-grade durability. The front side is composed of polypropylene insulation facing, with a white kraft paper backing on back side. WMP-10 is slightly heavier than WMP-VR facing.


 

Plans only? Girts Placed Correctly, and Sheeting

Engineer sealed pole barnDEAR POLE BARN GURU: Hi, do you sell pole barn plans without material kits? I’m interested in pricing a set of plans from you and procuring my own materials. If that’s a service you can provide please let me know. I’m looking to get a plan set for a 40’x45′ pole barn.

Thank you, DAMIEN in PORTLAND

DEAR DAMIEN: Here is an article with all of the information you will need: https://www.hansenpolebuildings.com/2017/06/pole-building-plans-sale/

 

DEAR POLE BARN GURU: my side wall columns are 4 ply 2×8’s and are a little over 7″ deep. My commercial girts are 2×10’s(9.25″). The girts are extended past both the skirt board and the 2×4 at the top of the wall by 2.25″-1.5″=0.75″.> How is this supposed to work? RICK in LUCEDALE

DEAR RICK: Place the girts so the outside of the girt is 1-1/2″ past the columns, any excess will be to the inside. When you sheetrock, the drywall will be attached to the girts and go right over the columns. See Chapter 29 of the Hansen Pole Buildings Construction Manual, most common mistake #4.

 

DEAR POLE BARN GURU: Does a residential pole barn home require exterior and roof sheathing? And if not required, would you recommend osb or plywood sheathing?
Thank you, JOE in SANDY RIDGE

DEAR JOE: If the siding and roofing are both roll formed steel panels, then no other sheathing would be required, unless the load situation is such as to require sheathing under the steel for shear resistance purposes. You should, however, be using Building Wrap under the wall steel and make some sort of provision for condensation control under the roof steel (either a radiant reflective barrier, sheathing with 30# felt, Condenstop/Dripstop or closed cell spray foam as examples).

As far as product – unless you are counting upon the sheathing being the holding point for the screws, OSB will do everything you need it to do.

 

A Retro-Fit, Truss Support? and Sliding Door Installation

The pole barn Guru looks at a Retro-Fit, truss supports, and installing a sliding door.

DEAR POLE BARN GURU: I have a question about Retro-Fit insulating my pole barn. I live in Southwest Michigan and bought my house with an existing 40’x60′ building, just used for storing farm equipment before I acquired it. Steel roofing straight to the roof purlins and steel siding straight to the wall purlins. Can I put a metal ceiling in with blown fiberglass insulation above and metal walls with Batts between the inside wall and outside wall, or do I need to have some sort of vapor barrier? MITCH in MICHIGAN

DEAR MITCH: First things first, in order to retro-fit the trusses, confirm the trusses are capable of supporting the weight of the steel liner panels and insulation. Most post frame building trusses are not designed to support a ceiling. There should be a stamp on every truss which identifies the truss manufacturer as well as the design loads. You need a minimum three psf (pounds per square foot) bottom chord load to support the ceiling. If it is less, and you can contact the truss manufacturer who should be able to provide an engineered repair to upgrade the trusses, for a nominal fee.

You will need to have some form of thermal break below the roof steel – my choice would be closed cell spray foam. On the walls, you should really have a building wrap between the steel and the framing, however an inch or so of closed cell spray foam would work, filling the balance of the cavity with unfaced fiberglass, then a well sealed vapor barrier on the inside.

 

Engineer sealed pole barnDEAR POLE BARN GURU: Pole Barn Guru, do you have to have girt under end trusses. End trusses setting on 2×12 from header and nailed to 6×6 pole with 2×6 blocking below trusses 24″o.c. sheated header 3 2×12 notch blocked and clipped. STEVE in CHEYENNE

DEAR STEVE: In order for me to answer your question, I would need to see the engineered plans for your building. If you are unsure of how to determine from your plans, you could contact the engineer of record who designed your building and ask him or her.

DEAR POLE BARN GURU: On a sliding 4×8 walk in door, on the barn exterior are all 4 sides flat or is the top out the thickness of say 1.5 inches? If it is out will it not seal? If all is flush with it not roll easy? Joe

Figure 27-5

DEAR JOE: The sliding door track needs to be mounted to a ‘track board’ which is typically a 2×6 placed on the face of the sliding door header. This puts the top out 1-1/2″ which allows the door to be able to slide past the adjacent siding without banging against it. Sliding doors do not and will not seal air tight, so this should not be an issue unless you had some sort of unrealistic expectations.

The Cheaper Roof Style, Plan Sales, and Engineering!

DEAR POLE BARN GURU: For a span of 84 feet, which is cheaper, a single slope roof or a gabled roof? ANTHONY in NEW ORLEANS

DEAR ANTHONY: At almost any span a gabled roof is going to be less expensive. At an 84 foot span, without question it will be significantly so.

DEAR POLE BARN GURU: I am curious if you sell custom plans without the kit. I am interested in a plan for a 26 x 26 pole garage with a room above and dormer on each side. I would like to use local supplies.

Thanks for the info. AIMEE in KALISPELL

Engineer sealed pole barnDEAR AIMEE: Thank you very much for your interest. Hansen Pole Buildings is unique in that we have formed relationships with suppliers all over the United States – including local to you! These relationships allow for the bulk of your materials to be delivered to your site, from suppliers who are generally within just a few miles of you. Due to our tremendous buying power, we are able to negotiate prices on materials far below what either the general public, or even builders would be able to get. We get you the benefits of both worlds – close to home and at a great price.

Many companies, such as ours, do not sell “just pole barn plans”.

Why? Many reasons.

1. We have streamlined our process for efficiency. This means by the time you get your plans, we are far into a ton of series of steps happening concurrently – and have done much of the “work”….which has a cost. People are willing to pay an architect several thousand dollars for house plans, but they are unwilling to pay an appropriate amount for the work involved to produce truly custom pole building plans.

2. You get the plans from us, but decide to purchase your materials “elsewhere” and then are disappointed because you paid a lot more than you thought it was going to cost.

3. Worst of all, you purchase materials that don’t match the pole barn plans from someone else and your building contractor does not build to our plans and blame us when the Building Department won’t sign off on your building.

DEAR POLE BARN GURU: I am building a home on a steep slope, what size foundations should I use for a 8 inch x 8 inch steel column embedded in the foundations, how square and how deep should each column foundation be? Regards ALAN in SAN RAMON COSTA RICA

DEAR ALAN: My step-sister and her husband lived in Playa Potrero for many years, so I have an affinity for Costa Rica.

There are so many variables which would go into the calculation for an adequate footing for your columns. The best solution is to get in contact with the structural engineer in Costa Rica who designed your home. He or she might need to have some soils tests done by a geotechnical engineer to determine the allowable bearing pressure of the soils at your site (I know I would certainly want to have this information). Your engineer will be able to calculate the live and dead loads which will be applied to the column (and hence the footing) to be able to provide you with the information on your foundation which will keep your home standing for generations to come.

 

Roof Trusses? Contractor Reviews, and Insulation Installation!

DEAR POLE BARN GURU: I would like to rip off my current roof of trusses that are made of 2x4s 2 feet on center with new one of mono-pitched trusses that are every 4-ft or less on center. The roofing material on top of the new trusses would be a SIP panel of some sort. The unfinished ceiling would be the bottom of the SIP panel. The house would have exposed trusses to create a loftier feel as the ceilings are currently too low. (house is 28 ft wide by 30 feet long)

Is this something that you can help with — the design & manufacture of the trusses/roof?

Thanks! NATHAN in KIRKLAND

DEAR NATHAN: Your Building Department is going to require engineer sealed plans in order to issue a building permit for your project. As such, your best bet is to hire a local engineer who is experienced in wood frame construction to provide your plans. They should come out to your house and do a thorough investigation into the adequacy of the structure to support the loads.

Some thoughts to consider – SIPs are going to prove to be very expensive. You could create a more spacious feel by constructing a knee wall on top of one of the existing walls, then use I joists or parallel chord trusses – either of which can be insulated between to give an adequate R value.

DEAR POLE BARN GURU: How can I find independent customer reviews in Washington state for Pride in Construction. GINGER in TACOMA

DEAR GINGER: Getting independent customer reviews on any building contractor anywhere is a challenge, as most builders do not construct enough buildings to develop much of a track record either good or bad.

Here are the seven steps to not getting yourself burned by any contractor, follow these: https://www.hansenpolebuildings.com/2013/07/contractor-6/ and require a performance bond and you will greatly limit your risk of not getting the finished product you expected. Here is Performance Bond information: https://www.hansenpolebuildings.com/2012/07/contractor-bonding/.

 

DEAR POLE BARN GURU: I will be installing insulation under the steel roof.  Are staple guns the best choice for temporary stabilization until the roof is added?  What length staples?  Which gauge staples?  Narrow?  Electric, air or grip staple gun?  Recommendations?  I will be using metal tape to join each roll of insulation side-by-side.

Trying not to re-invent the wheel, that’s why I went Hansen of course. RALPH in KENNEWICK

DEAR RALPH: From Chapter 14 of the Hansen Pole Buildings’ Installation Guide: Using a minimum 5/16” galvanized staple, staple through insulation to eave purlin top. As an alternative to staples, 1” galvanized roofing nails (with the big plastic washers) also work well.

These fasteners are only going to be needed long enough to get a sheet of steel on top of them, so there is no occasion to get fancy at this juncture. I’ve found a tack hammer to be more than adequate.

Keep in mind, the one edge of each roll of A1V insulation has a pull strip on it, with adhesive under the pull strip. This eliminates the need to use rolls of tape to adjoin each piece of insulation.

 

An Apartment Addition?

DEAR POLE BARN GURU: Can you supply me with a copy of the sparrow barn in Texas plans It is a wedding venue I would like to copy. JAMES in HAMPTON

DEAR JAMES: Certainly we can, stamped by a registered professional engineer, and custom designed for your climactic loads – and for free. They come along with your investment in a new Hansen Pole Building complete kit package.

Pole Barn Prices

DEAR POLE BARN GURU: I built a 40x60x14 pole barn, trusses 4’oc, cement floor with seal, foil bubble wrap outside all girts and purlins, vented soffits and continuous ridgevent. Trusses have 5psf bottom cord rating. I have read all the posts of yours I could. Would like to put in 24×40 apartment and was looking to put in BIBS insulation with horizontal bookcase framing but ran into a few questions. I’m concerned about drywall cracking/nail popping if I strap bottom truss cords and apply drywall to that. If I drop the ceiling, however, I’ll have to do vertical studs for the ceiling joists to sit on. I see a problem with fireblocking too. How best do you fireblock behind posts (between girts) with bookcased studs? Vertical studs would be even more difficult to fireblock, with 1.5 inch gaps everywhere. Last question is insulation…..With the impermeable foil bubble wrap up against the steel siding, I was going to use the mesh fabric and BIBS only before drywall. I’m concerned about a vapor barrier against drywall as this will primarily be used in summer with a/c on the interior and an outside humid climate. I appreciate any help and advice. MARCUS in ROANOKE

DEAR MARCUS: I appreciate you being a loyal reader!

You will want to place 2×4 ceiling joists on edge (two inch face towards the floor and sky) every 24 inches between the truss bottom chords, using Simpson 2×4 joist hangers on each end. With 5/8″ gypsum wallboard, screwed on per the manufacturer’s installation instructions, it is unlikely you will experience unusual drywall cracking or nail popping. Properly done, your bookcase studs (wall girts) should be supporting the siding on the outside and drywall on the inside. Installed this way, they effectively serve as fire blocking. In the event your building has “barn” style wall girts (flat on the outside face of the columns), use bookshelf girts of a large enough dimension to reach the siding, as well as extend to at least the inside face of the columns (e.g. 2×8 on a 6×6 column).

Commercial-Wall-Girts_EditedThere is going to be a challenge on the walls….your building should actually have building wrap on the outside of the framing to allow any water vapor in the wall cavity to escape to the outside world. The wall vapor barrier should be on the inside face of the wall girts to prevent moist air from inside of your apartment from entering the wall cavity. The reflective insulation in your walls should be either removed or at the very least punctured frequently, prior to wall insulation being installed.

 

DEAR POLE BARN GURU: I am installing shutters on my home, which is a barn style home with metal siding.  My husband is very concerned about which type of screws to use to prevent leaking or rusting.  What do you suggest? AMELIA in HONEA PATH

DEAR AMELIA: Builders Edge Shutter-Lok patented fastening system makes installation fast and easy. Shutter-Lok holds in any material. Shutter-Lok features a durable copolymer construction with molded-through color so that there is no paint to ever scratch, flake, or fade. Installation requires drill with 1/4″ masonry bit.