Tag Archives: RV Storage

Splash Boards, Roof Loads, and Truss Spacing

This week the Pole Barn Guru answers reader questions about shrinkage of splash boards installed wet, roof load capacity, and truss spacing for an RV storage building.

DEAR POLE BARN GURU: I have two questions (related) regarding splash boards and concrete floor top. My splash boards have been in place for quite a while, and have actually shrunk (they were quite wet when nailed in place). There are several that are not over 7 inches wide. I’m going to end up with only 3-1/2 inches of splash board above the concrete. Is this sufficient? The tops of the splash boards are very level, and I’m thinking of attaching treated 2x4s on the inside to screed against. It would be easier (and probably more accurate/consistent) for me to measure 3-1/2 inches down from the top rather than up from the bottom of the splash boards.

Also, wondering if there is a benefit to placing 3 x 1/4 inch galvanized lag bolts, 1 inch into the splash boards from the interior side 1 or 2 feet apart, to “anchor” the splash boards to the slab?

Thanks so much for sharing your experience and insights! GREG in COLVILLE

DEAR GREG: As long as you are measuring from a level point and top of your concrete slab will be below bottom of your base trim you will be all good with measuring down 3-1/2″ from splash board tops. While I have not done it personally, I know more than one person who has used a pressure preservative treated 2×4 to screed against as you describe. At a minimum it should be rated UC-4A (ground contact) for treatment.

There might be some small benefit to be gained by using a mechanical attachment of splash boards to your slab. As to how much, I have not seen any studies to verify.

Thank you for your kind words and please remember to send me progress photos!

 

DEAR POLE BARN GURU: Do you know how much weight per square foot the roof of a pole building can hold?  My building is 64’ x 36’, if that matters. ROBERT

DEAR ROBERT: Weight per square foot (psf) will be dependent upon what your building was engineered to support. Every set of engineer sealed building plans is required to list all loads to be supported. Usually this will be specified by a value for sloped roof snow load (Ps) for roof plane live loads. Dead loads (actual weight of structure and supported materials) should also be listed.

 

DEAR POLE BARN GURU: I’m wanting to do a pole barn to park my RV under for the winter. My question is can I use a single truss spaced at 10’? Do I need to use two trusses per post? ERIC in BONNERS FERRY

DEAR ERIC: Without knowing how far you intend to span with your trusses it is difficult to provide a definitive answer. Boundary County does not require building inspections, so even though you are in an area of extremely high snow loads – risks end up being upon you as a new building owner.

While a single ply truss may work, in most instances your investment into true double trusses (nailed face-to-face as a pair) is minimal. Double trusses provide greater reliability as your probability of having two adjacent trusses having a same ‘weak link’ is small. Bracing requirements are also reduced when a pair of trusses are utilized.

Even though you may not need a building permit, I would strongly encourage you to only erect a fully engineered building. Protection for your RV is only going to be as good as what your building is designed for.

 

A “Man Cave,” A Quote Request, and Snow Loads

This Monday’s PBG discusses a “Man Cave” designed with SIP panels, a quote request from Texas, and what our snow loads are for our buildings.

DEAR POLE BARN GURU: Considering a monitor style pole building with RV storage in center and living quarters on one side (loft in rear of building only) When RV is not in the center garage it would become the “Man Cave”.

I am considering timber frame trusses in only the center section of the Monitor Roof (likely 14′) and sip panels for roof insulation above trusses. Would make for pretty cool ceiling!!

I have scoured the internet for plans such as this – have you ever encountered or see a plan such as this? SCOTT in CAMBRIDGE

DEAR SCOTT: The reason you are not finding plans is because it would be both very cool and amazingly expensive. I have investigated SIPs panels a few times and found them to be prohibitively spendy. I intend to add onto our post frame shouse next Spring with a similar roof system in mind. To get the look I am after, I intend to build glulam trusses with purlins above them, closed cell spray foam insulation and most likely corrugated steel panels on the underside of the purlins. If you are intent upon a design such as you envision, you will need to invest in services of a Registered Professional Engineer to provide structural plans.

 

DEAR POLE BARN GURU: I am ready to build but I am in Texas. The plans were designed for traditional stick frame construction. Can you quote me from those plans? SOCRATES in McALLEN

DEAR SOCRATES: We most certainly can.

We would appreciate the opportunity to participate in your new home. Please email your building plans, site address and best contact number to Caleb@HansenPoleBuildings.com or call 1(866)200-9657

Thank you. A Hansen Pole Buildings’ Designer will also be reaching out to you.

 

DEAR POLE BARN GURU: What is the snow load on the roofs of your buildings? KAREN in ALBUQUERQUE

DEAR KAREN: Every Hansen Pole Building is fully engineered to meet or exceed Code required snow and wind loads at the site the building will be erected upon. We have provided buildings designed for snow loads in excess of 400 psf (pounds per square foot). Providing us (or any supplier) with answers to these questions will assist in making your journey to a new building a smooth process: https://www.hansenpolebuildings.com/2019/01/building-department-checklist-2019-part-1/ and
https://www.hansenpolebuildings.com/2019/01/building-department-checklist-2019-part-ii/

 

 

 

A Shouse, Adding Tin to Block Siding, and Truss Carriers

This week the Pole Barn Guru tackles the subjects of building a shouse with RV storage, how to add tin to block siding, and truss carriers vs notched posts.

DEAR POLE BARN GURU: Good morning!

My wife and are currently going to market with our home in Lakeville and are considering our next steps.  We have a great deal of interest in exploring an affordable option for our current needs which include about 1,500 SF of residential space and then remaining storage for a 45’ motorcoach, our vehicles/toys, shop and an above ground “block” safe room.  As we have no idea what the cost, or practicality, of this option is we felt it would be a good first step to determine your design services and simply what you have to offer in terms of options.

We do not have a piece of land acquired (though it would likely be in S/SE MN) as we need to first determine the viability of the option and then get a better sense for what the area counties allow/require.

Hopeful you can assist! MITCH & WENDY in LAKEVILLE

DEAR MITCH AND WENDY: Thank you for your interest! Our team members at Hansen Pole Buildings are barndominium experts. Basically your only limitations will be imagination, budget and available space.

Links in this article should answer many of your questions: https://www.hansenpolebuildings.com/2019/10/show-me-your-barndominium-plans-please/.

 

DEAR POLE BARN GURU: I came across this sight and found it very informative.

I have a question:  I have a 8′ block foundation with 6′ above the block that is tinned. I want to tin the block to match.

Tinning is not the problem but what or how do I fasten the tin to the block?

Type of fasteners work best? Later, BRIAN

DEAR BRIAN: Thank you for your kind words. Your steel siding should be screwed onto 2×4 horizontals. These 2×4 can be attached to your block using Tapcon concrete screws. Attach steel siding to 2x4s using 1-1/2″ powder coated diaphragm screws.

 

DEAR POLE BARN GURU: Should the top boards be on the inside and outside? MARK in LAWRENCEBURG

DEAR MARK: By “top boards” I will guess you are placing ‘truss carriers’ (headers) between columns in order to support trusses. In my humble opinion it would be best to utilize a two-ply ganged prefabricated wood roof truss at each column (notched in) and eliminate carriers entirely. It is far cleaner structurally as you eliminate numerous connections and if a failure is going to occur, it is most often at a connection.

In direct answer to your concern, placement of your top boards and their proper attachment will be called out for on your engineer sealed building plans. Should you not be building from an engineered plan, it would be prudent to invest in one’s service now, before a crucial design flaw becomes a failure.

For extended reading on truss carriers, please see: https://www.hansenpolebuildings.com/2018/10/what-size-truss-carriers/

 

 

 

 

 

A Gambrel Pole Barn, Ceiling Heights, and RV Storage Solutions

Today the Pole barn Guru discusses questions about Gambrel buildings, a minimum ceiling height for a loft, and RV storage solutions.

DEAR POLE BARN GURU: Do you make plans for 18 x 20 gambrel roof pole barns? BEN in HOWELL

DEAR BEN: Hansen Pole Buildings can provide materials, assembly instructions and engineer sealed plans for virtually any dimension gambrel roofed pole barn – including your 18 x 20.

 

DEAR POLE BARN GURU: I am building a pole barn house and want to put a bedroom in the loft. What height do I need to have to be able to stand up in the bedroom? BRENDA in SPRING VALLEY

DEAR BRENDA: A quandary exists in providing you an answer as IRC (International Residential Code) makes no provision for post frame (pole) buildings, so therefore IBC (International Building Code) should be code to be used for their correct design.

Under IBC rules minimum ceiling height in these buildings must be 7 feet 6 inches in hallways, common areas, and habitable rooms.

According to IRC, all habitable rooms must have a minimum ceiling height of seven feet. Habitable rooms include bedrooms, living spaces and kitchens but exclude bathrooms, hallways, utility spaces and closets. A ceiling with exposed beams spaced four feet or more apart can measure 6 feet 6 inches from floor to underside of beams. Bathrooms may have a minimum ceiling height of 6 feet 8 inches.

Minimum ceiling height in rooms with sloped ceilings (such as a finished attic space) of seven feet over 50 percent or more of room area. Room area calculation in this case will be calculated as total floor space with walls (or headroom) five feet or greater tall. Areas with ceilings lower than 5 feet are allowed but do not count toward official room area total (IRC rules also include minimum floor space for most habitable rooms).

RV Storage BuildingDEAR POLE BARN GURU: How much will it cost to build a roof only pole structure tall enough for RV while in use as shelter from elements but allowing as much light as possible.
Thanks MARY in SANDPOINT

DEAR MARY: There are numerous variables to be discussed between yourself and a Building Designer (please dial 866-200-9657 to speak with one) prior to being able to give an accurate price. Amongst these will be the height of your current (and any future) RV, as well as its length. Ultimately you may find it more cost affordable to cover one or more walls, as rarely is a roof only structure a most practical solution. For more reading regarding about this subject, please see: https://www.hansenpolebuildings.com/2015/04/roof-only-pole-buildings/.

 

 

5 Tips for Storing and Protecting Your RV

Hansen Pole RV StorageAs an RV owner, you may enjoy weeks or even months of traveling the country every year. But do you have a plan in place for those times when you won’t be using your motorhome? If you have a permanent home and give your RV a break for part of the year, it’s important to think about proper storage. After all, excessive exposure to the elements and local pests can lead to faded paint, cracked vinyl, compromised insulation, damaged wires, and other problems.

Not sure how to keep your RV in the best possible condition when it’s not in use? Start with these 5 RV storage tips.

Wash and Wax the Exterior

Be sure to use a wax that was specifically formulated for the material from which your motorhome exterior is made. This will help protect the vehicle’s finish.

Clean Out the Interior

If you’re preparing your RV for storage, you might as well take the opportunity to clean out the interior. Wipe down all surfaces and look for ways to minimize clutter. Remove all food and crumbs so that you don’t attract any unwanted animal visitors.

Check for Cracks and Openings

Any openings in your RV can let moisture in, which can lead to interior damage. Check the roof seams, body seams, and window sealant, and make sure there aren’t any gaps or holes in the vehicle’s underside. If you do find any gaps, fill them with silicone or expanding foam—just make sure you test the expanding foam out somewhere else first if you’ve never used it before.

Remove Batteries and Change Your Oil

For long-term RV storage, consider removing your vehicle’s batteries and storing them somewhere they won’t freeze. You should also change your oil for your engine and generator so that you don’t have to deal with corrosion.

Keep Your RV Indoors

One of the best solutions for long-term RV storage is an indoor space. Hansen Pole Buildings offers custom RV storage building kits, allowing you to easily construct a custom garage that fits your particular motorhome. Indoor RV storage buildings are available in a range of styles (including gable, monitor, and gambrel) as well as wall materials (including board and batten, vinyl, steel, or even brick) so that you can choose the right aesthetic for your property.

With your motorhome in an indoor or covered RV storage building, you can rest easy knowing it will be protected from the elements and ready to go the next time you plan to hit the road.

When Your RV Doesn’t Fit

When It Just isn’t Tall Enough

Early in my career supplying pole building kit packages, we provided a building to a client in Oregon for him to house his motor home. Our salesperson really felt he had done due diligence in having the client measure the height of the motorhome before ordering the building.

After the building was completed, the client sent us a photo of his new building – which he absolutely was thrilled with. And the building was frankly beautiful.

I could immediately tell from the photo there was a problem with the building……

The motorhome was parked outside.

It seems the client actually did not measure the height of his motorhome, he merely guessed it would fit through a 12 foot tall door!

In a related more recent scenario….

RV Storage BuildingWe have a client who is enjoying his 30 foot wide pole building – which has a ten foot wall height. It did everything he wanted it to, until he bought an RV. Which is nearly 12 feet tall.

No matter how well he greases it up, the RV will just not fit into his existing building.

The first suggestion was to put a 12 foot wide side shed on one side, with a very flat roof slope which would extend up to the peak of his existing building. Needing a 12’6” eave height on the low side of the shed, this would result in a slope of only 1.11/12.

Problem – on roof slopes less than 3/12 the steel companies all disclaim any warranty. Bigger problem, the existing building has prefabricated roof trusses, and the extension to run from the existing wall line to the peak of the roof would place a point load on the peak of the trusses, which they are not designed for. Framing (such as a tapered stud wall) could be placed on top of the trusses to support the rafters, but this is just adding to complexity and costs.

Further, the steel siding on one-half of each endwall would need to be replaced with longer panels, as would the wall towards the shed.

My proposed solution, was to first gutter the side of the existing building towards where he wants to park his RV. Then construct a free standing gabled building, as a roof only, immediately adjacent to the gutter. This would prove an immensely less expensive solution.

To confound things further, it turns out the client is in a HOA (Home Owners Association) which limits property owners to one detached accessory building.

I went back to my proverbial “drawing board” and suggested he place siding from the roofline of the new cover, down to the roof of the existing building, allowing just enough gap to allow water to flow into the gutter. This would effectively connect the two roofs into a single structure.

I am waiting to hear if this satisfies the HOA!