Tag Archives: Roof Only

Advice on a Hay Barns, and Registered Design Professionals (Use them)!

Today Mike advises on the Post Frame construction of Roof Only Hay Barns, and the need to use a Registered Design Professional.

DEAR POLE BARN GURU: You have a page showing roof only hay barns. There are two photos, one which shows a partially enclosed hay barn. I am very interested in this for my ranch…..what are its dimensions? I will need full walls along three sides, and a partial wall, like the one you show in the photo along the front side. DAVE in PETALUMA

About Hansen BuildingsDEAR DAVE: Rather than working off from the dimensions of a building which best fit some prior client’s wants and needs, you will be far better ahead to work with one of the Hansen Pole Buildings’ Designers to come up with the dimensions and features which will best fit with your budget. If you can do a design which has some or all of both of the narrow (peaked) endwalls enclosed from roofline to the ground, it will normally be the most cost effective.

 

DEAR POLE BARN GURU: What diameter holes do I dig for my post when my barn is 44’x32’? Trusses are spanning the 44’ way. TERRY in COLUMBIA CITY

DEAR TERRY: The Registered Design Professional (RDP – architect or engineer) who designed your building and sealed the plans for you will have called out the depth and diameter of the column holes as well as concrete footing and encasement requirements.

He or she takes into account all of the climactic loads placed upon your building – wind, snow and seismic, along with the allowable soil bearing capacity of your site in making the determination. The other factors they will have taken into account include the spacing of the columns, eave height, roof slope as well as the dead loads the building must support (not only the weight of the building as proposed to be constructed, but also future loads such as wall and ceiling finishes).

If by some chance you do not have a RDP involved in your project – go hire one now, it is money well spent. Or, better yet, invest in an engineered post frame building kit package which will come with complete plans.

 

DEAR POLE BARN GURU: We are building a pole barn but have decided to use timber frame scissor trusses in the open area where the trusses will be visible. Three trusses, made from 8×10 timbers will be in a area that is fully open. The other 3 trusses will be prefab, “regular”, as they will not be visible (one inside interior wall and other 2 at gable ends. 
I’m having trouble finding a way to attach the purlins to the timbers in a way that the will not have exposed Simpson seismic and hurricane hangers. There must be a hanger that can be used with ‘simple’ blocking that will attach the purlins to the top of the timbers and still create a look as if the purlins are simply resting on the timbers. 
Any ideas? 
Thanks in advance for your advice! FAITH in SALEM

Engineer sealed pole barnDEAR FAITH: This is a question which is best posed to the RDP (Registered Design Professional – architect or engineer) who designed your building and provided the sealed blueprints for you to build from. I am not aware of an engineered hanger which will do what you are looking to accomplish, however there may be a direction in which to head for a solution. By predrilling holes through the purlins from narrow edge to narrow edge, it might be possible to utilize a number of very long spikes or drive screws which could provide the needed resistance to uplift and seismic forces. In order to have adequate area for connectors, it might take going to a three or four inch wide purlin, which may turn out to work well aesthetically with your timber framed trusses. There will need to be blocking placed on top of the trusses, between the purlins to prevent rotation.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Roof, The Roof… and Sheds without Sidewalls

Mike answers questions about a Roof Line, Roofing with OSB layer, and Endwall Only Sheds:

DEAR POLE BARN GURU: What is the roof line style in the attached picture called? BRYAN in MARYSVILLE

DEAR BRYAN: The prefabricated roof truss folks would refer to this as being a Polynesian roof – one in which the outer portion is at a lower slope than the center portion. I tend to steer clear of steeper-to-flatter roof slope changes as they just increase the possibility of a future leak, however it is certainly doable. Your photo also features a widow’s peak at the center.

 

DEAR POLE BARN GURU: Hello Guru, I am Putting 1/2″ Plywood On the trusses first before the metal roof, what do U recommend to cover the plywood, for vapor barrier protection? I was just gonna use felt paper! any recommendations? Thanx MIKE in ROCHESTER

DEAR MIKE: If applying the plywood directly over trusses spaced every two feet, you will need to add purlins in order to screw the roofing down (screws into plywood or OSB are inadequate for wind uplift). Steel manufacturers recommend the use of 30# asphalt impregnated paper (roofing felt) between sheathing and roofing.

DEAR POLE BARN GURU: What is it called if I only want a structure that has a wall in the front and wall in the back but open on the sides for animal pens? I can’t seem to find ANY images of this type of building. CHRISTINE in BERTRAM

DEAR CHRISTINE: I would call it a loafing shed with both eave sides open. It could be either single sloped, or have peaked endwalls.

Materials Mastery with the PBG!

DEAR POLE BARN GURU: Hi: I have a design and will build myself. Do you sell components such as poles and trusses? Or is it possible to purchase one of your kits and leave off certain materials? For example, I want to use corrugated metal siding. If you don’t supply that could it be left off? I have a design already and can send that so your folks know what I’m looking for and might be able to advise. Thanks – JUD in LOOMIS

DEAR JUD: Typically it is not cost effective for either our clients or us to provide just a handful of components for a building, especially if we (and our engineers) are responsible for the structural design of the building.

About Hansen BuildingsWe most often supply all of the components required for assembly, other than concrete, rebar and any nails which would be commonly driven by a nail gun. This gives our clients the most value for their investment, as well as insuring the components being furnished are meeting with the structural requirements of the plans.

A Hansen Pole Buildings’ Designer will be in contact with you shortly to discuss details with you.

DEAR POLE BARN GURU: I am within a few weeks of placing my order for my residential kit but I have a question about siding. My wife has veto’d metal siding so we will be specifying either hardie board siding or LP Smartside. I’ve been assuming that in order to use such siding in place of metal, the walls must be sheathed with OSB for structural reasons? I’m guessing that the OSB sheathing would not have enough holding strength for the siding to attach directly and that I would need to install vertical furring strips nailed to the girts in order to attach the siding? The problem is that I have heard stories about waves in the siding when attached this way. What does one need to do in order to prevent wavy siding?

Thanks. LONNIE in COLORADO SPRINGS

DEAR LONNIE: Most jurisdictions will allow panels (4′ x 8′ typically) of cement based siding or LP Smartside to be installed directly over framing (wall girts) spaced up to 24 inches on center. My guess is you are looking at doing a lap siding, in which case the walls would need to be first sheathed with either 7/16″ OSB or 15/32″ plywood in order to carry the wind shear loads. When this is the case, we plan upon furnishing 2×4 vertical blocking every two feet to give a positive attachment for the siding.

In order to prevent wavy siding – just don’t use it. I’ve installed a fair amount of lap siding (back in the day) as well as seen it upon numerous buildings and at some point it always has waves. Why? It is a function of expansion and contraction. If the siding is applied when cold, it will wave between fasteners when it heats up. Applied warm and as it shrinks it strains against the end fasteners and gets gaps between end joints. All-in-all, maybe not the best aesthetic solution.

I currently own three different post frame (pole) buildings. The oldest two are sided with 1×8 cedar channel run vertically (I wanted to match the house). When I painted the buildings for about the fifth time, my lovely bride asked me why I had not put steel siding on them to begin with, as it would have been maintenance free (not to mention less expensive). Right now I live in a magnificent post frame home – with steel siding. Wouldn’t have it any other way and my wife will agree it is by far the best solution for both looks and durability. In the end – people will notice the colors, but chances are the great majority will never pay attention to what the actual material is.

DEAR POLE BARN GURU: We want to build a pole structure for RV cover similar to a pole barn but no sides. Pole sides and roof clearance of 14 feet, 36 long, 24 wide (where post in ground)
Looking for plan and help to build. Hope you can direct us. Thanks JUDY in MISSION

DEAR JUDY: Yours is most certainly a building which we can assist you with. If possible, it will be less expensive to have at least one of the 24 foot endwalls covered to the ground. Here is an article which explains why: https://www.hansenpolebuildings.com/2015/04/roof-only-pole-buildings/

One of the senior Hansen Pole Buildings’ Designers will be in contact with you shortly to assist you with your new post frame building.

 

How Can I Add interior Walls to a Post Frame Building?

DEAR POLE BARN GURU: How difficult is it to add interior walls to build rooms inside the pole barn. Are more materials needed to add interior rooms and do the exterior walls need extra support? PATRICIA in McMINNVILLE

DEAR PATRICIA: The beauty of post frame (pole barn) buildings is the great majority of them are designed to be clearspan – there are rarely interior columns to avoid, so non-structural interior walls can be placed anywhere!

Home OfficeThis was a great feature for my lovely bride and I, as we moved walls all around until we came up with the configuration which best met with our needs – after the building shell was completed.

There is a caveat – if the interior of your building is going to have gypsum drywall (aka sheetrock) it is important to have the structure designed to limit the deflection. Most post frame buildings are designed with only the deflection of steel siding in mind, which would cause many drywall joints to crack under wind or seismic events.

If properly designed (better make sure an engineer was involved in those original plans) then no materials should have to be added to the exterior framework in order to add interior walls. You will, of course, have to provide the materials for the interior walls themselves.

DEAR POLE BARN GURU: Can Hansen provide a kit that will work as a picnic shelter with no walls, just the poles and the roof with the triangle gable ends covered with siding? JOE in MISENHEIMER

DEAR JOE: Yes we can provide roof only buildings. In most cases, it is less expensive to cover one or both endwalls to the ground, rather than building just a pavilion style structure. Here is a link to a previous article where I expound upon why: https://www.hansenpolebuildings.com/2015/04/roof-only-pole-buildings/

DEAR POLE BARN GURU: I am doing a barn w apartment , the whole building will be conditioned space, I am looking for the best house wrap for my barn and new home?

I am wondering if insulated Tylek or insulated panels are worth it on outside since I’m framing w 2×6 and concrete lap siding? Thanks DANIEL in WOODBINE

DEAR DANIEL: Most Building Permit issuing jurisdictions are going to require a Weather Resistant Barrier underneath siding around a conditioned space, so there is probably not much of a choice. For the most part, concrete lap siding should be installed over a solid sheathing such as OSB (oriented strand board) or plywood to prevent waves in the material and to give the building adequate shear resistance. Here is the link to the first of a three part series of articles I wrote on Weather Resistant Barriers: https://www.hansenpolebuildings.com/2016/01/determining-the-most-effective-building-weather-resistant-barrier-part-1/.

Clear Span Width, Interior Sliders, and Roof Quote!

DEAR POLE BARN GURU: What is the widest free span I can get in a pole barn? I live in zip 54474 for snow loads. Needs to have a door opening of 14′.

LES in ROSHOLTDEAR LES: It would be very practical to have a clearspan of up to and including 80 feet. In some markets, we are able to have clearspan trusses of up to 100 feet prefabricated and shipped.

DEAR POLE BARN GURU: Good afternoon,  

I’m writing to see if you offer some sort of light-weight door panel system for an interior application in a courthouse. Our design intent is to have two movable door panels (that appear to be made of solid wood) in a bypassing setup. Each door panel is approximately 12’-0”H x 13’-9”W. Is there some way to achieve this size of panel that is movable by an average person? Maybe something with a fiberglass/steel structure paneled with a wood veneer? LAUREN IN NEW YORK

DEAR LAUREN: Thank you very much for your inquiry. Our sliding doors are appropriate for exterior applications on barns and we provide them only with the investment in a complete post frame building package.

DEAR POLE BARN GURU: Looking to see if a quote for a roof is reasonable.
Endwalls width 20, Eavewalls Length 70, Eave Height 14 feet6 inches, Snow Load 40#, Bay Size Eavewalls 12, Bay Size Endwalls 12, Pitch 4 MICHELLE in BEAVERTON

DEAR MICHELLE: Chances are good the quote for a roof will be quite reasonable. Only one challenge – you did not happen to leave any way for us to contact you!

Need a quote on a complete post frame building package? The easiest and quickest way to get one is to complete a request at: https://www.hansenpolebuildings.com/freequote/ . The more ways you can provide to contact you (home and cell phone numbers, email address, Skype, etc.) the more likely you will be to get a quick response.